American Friends of the Parents Circle-Families Forum

The Parents Circle Families Forum is a joint Israeli-Palestinian organization made up of more than 600 bereaved families. Their common bond is that they have lost a close family member to the conflict. But instead of choosing revenge, they have chosen a path of reconciliation.

Location: Uniondale , New York
Year founded: 1994

Description

The Parents Circle - Families Forum is a joint Israeli-Palestinian organization made up of more than 600 bereaved families. Their common bond is that they have lost a close family member to the conflict. But instead of choosing revenge, they have chosen a path of reconciliation.

Through the different works of the PCFF, these bereaved members have joined together to take tens of thousands of Palestinians and Israelis on their personal journeys of reconciliation. It is often raw and always emotional. But out of these interactions, comes change. Not the kind of change that makes headlines, but a more personal and profound shift in perspective.

These bereaved members, armed with the credibility of their loss and the uncommon path they have chosen, have opened a crack in the psyche of a hardened populous. They have begun to stir an awareness about the conflict that transcends history and politics. For many, it is the first time they have seen “the other side” as human.

The PCFF hopes for the day that political leaders reach agreement for peace. But they strongly believe that reconciliation between the Israeli and Palestinian people is essential to ensuring that peace is sustainable.

The PCFF seeks funding opportunities to increase the impact of its diverse array of peace building and dialogue programs, such as the Taking Steps initiative founded within our Women's Group; There Is Another Way, a project to document and share the stories of our Israeli and Palestinian members; and our solidarity activities performed internationally.

American Friends of the Parents Circle – Families Forum shares the human side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict with the American public in order to foster a peace and reconciliation process.

Dialogue Meetings

About

Every year, Israeli and Palestinian PCFF members facilitate 600 classroom dialogues together with high school aged youth both in Israel and Palestine. They share their personal stories and guide the participants through a discussion about the conflict and the possibility of reconciliation.

Israeli youth are approached mainly through formal education structures, including secondary and high schools, colleges, and universities. Palestinian youth and young adults are approached through non-formal settings, including community centers, refugee camp social structures, families close to the PCFF, youth groups and universities in Jerusalem and the West Bank. We aim to reach a diverse group of young people representative of both genders, minority groups, and socio-economic groups.


We send a pair of trained PCFF member facilitators— one Israeli and one Palestinian— together to these meetings. This is itself is an example and a lesson. IT allows an informal contact, an atmosphere of listening and empathy, thus neutralizing a number of myths. By describing their own personal loss and their decision to pursue reconciliation and non-violence, our members encourage the participants to being the long process of transforming their own feelings of suspicion, fear, and hatred. 


Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The overall objective of this project is to create a framework of reconciliation among Israelis and Palestinians in the absence of a political agreement and in preparation for an agreement to come. Our education work seeks to contribute to mutual understanding, empathy and tolerance between Israelis and Palestinians in order to foster an "emotional breakthrough" and a process of transformation and dialogue.

The program brings Israelis and Palestinians into the same room which helps to undermine stereotypes, discover the humanity of the "enemy" and foster a deep empathy. By describing their own personal loss and their opting for reconciliation and non-violence, our members encourage the participants to transform their own feelings of suspicion, fear and hatred. The meetings tackle psychological barriers by creating an emotional breakthrough allowing a change of perception and a chance to reconsider one's views and attitudes. For most of the participants it is their first opportunity to meet a representative from "the other side".

Back to Top

Program Description

Each dialogue meeting includes:

• Personal Narrative: One bereaved Palestinian and one bereaved Israeli member of the PCFF (the facilitators) tell his or her personal story regarding the conflict. They describe their intellectual and emotional choices which led them to the decision to pursue reconciliation and forgiveness rather than hatred and strife. Personal stories are a significant part of the dialogue meetings as people who have lost their loved ones are usually accepted as trustworthy witnesses for reconciliation.

• Question and Answer: Following the story-telling portion, participants have the opportunity to inquire further with the facilitators about their experiences and the choices they make. For most of the participants this is their 1st first time encountering meeting with someone from the other side. The Q&A phase allows them to struggle with their own prejudice and bias

• Open Discussion: Participants are prompted to engage in a conversation about their expectations, fear and views about peace and reconciliation. This is also an important opportunity for participants to have a direct dialogue with the facilitator from “the other side." It is often participants’ only chance to express their feelings and raise questions with someone from the “other side”.

•Beyond the Dialogue: Participants are presented with opportunities to partake in future PCFF initiative

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

The past several years of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict have been characterized by an absence and stalling of any political or diplomatic dialogue. The ongoing, intractable conflict continues to create barriers – both emotional and on the ground – between both societies. The need for dialogue and mutual understanding has become even more important in the absence of political negotiations and underscored by heightened violence and only emphasizes the role of civil society.

The impact of the PCFF's educational work goes far beyond the specific target population– primarily reached in classes or small groups. Additional circles of influence are the families of students, friends and neighbors. The assumption is that each and every participant in the dialogue workshops, after having experienced the "emotional breakthrough," wishes to share their experience with others, both within and outside the circle of participants.

Israeli students in the 12th grade go to the military service shortly after they attended the dialogue meetings. Israeli soldiers who have had preliminary lectures and encounters with representatives of the PCFF will most probably behave more humanely to Palestinians at checkpoints and in tense situations with the civilian population, thus will decrease hatred and fear. Moreover, they have received an insight into the meaning of the occupation from the Palestinian perspective and of their role in it. Palestinian youth play a significant role in organized uprisings including both Intifadas and are often the face of acts of terrorism. The percentage of youth among the Palestinian population is very high thus making up a large part of the population. Many of the students write feedback that meeting with the PCFF was for them a kind of revelation about the conflict. This sudden openness will also have political implications in the long run.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

In 2018, we held 352 dialogue meetings, bringing together approximately 7,400 Israelis, Palestinians, and internationals in Israel and Palestine..

From our 2015 Annual Report:

"The most significant moment for me this year was the Palestinian facilitators training weekend in Ashkelon. Veteran facilitators shared their experiences-- giving each other and new facilitators powerful tools to help them further spread our messages."

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

We measure the success of our program by analyzing participation rates and pre-/post- survey data. Our evaluations show that:
o 84% of participants shoed an improvement in awerenss of the other’s need for respect and acceptance.
o 87% of participants stated that the encounters helped them understand the other side’s point of view on the conflict.

By these measurements, we conclude that the project has achieved great success since it's formation in 2000, especially in light of the constant barriers to performing these efforts in schools in the area.

Back to Top

The Parallel Narrative Experience

About

The PCFF has been operating its flagship PNE program since 2010. In that time, more than twenty-five cohorts have participated, impacting over 1,000 Israeli and Palestinian participants. The PNE is a module made up of unilateral and bilateral workshops and dialogue activities over time between Israelis and Palestinians, to learn about the personal and national narrative of the other and support both sides in moving beyond exclusive truths, building trust, generating empathy and humanizing the other.


One aspect of learning about the national narratives of Israelis and Palestinians consists of visits to locations of historical importance. Cohorts of PNE participants together visit Lifta, a Palestinian village completely destroyed in 1948 during the “Nakba” (“catastrophe”). They also visit Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center together in Jerusalem.


Our narrative approach is at the root of all of our projects which strive towards a “better understanding of people”. The narrative approach, allows Israelis and Palestinians to understand each other as people – on the most human level – and not just as Israelis and Palestinians

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The PCFF works based on a two-pronged methodology, which informs the mission and purpose of our Narrative Program and all of our programs:



• Re-establishment of the respect for human rights through the knowledge and acknowledgement of the other. In general our activities yield a wave of sympathy and a re-encounter with the humanity of the other. This is a first but decisive step in the process of recognizing the human rights of the other: not only the fundamental right to peaceful life, but also all the other rights like the right to move freely, to enjoy health services, work, freedom of expression, etc.

• Power of dialogue through the personal and national narrative experience to create meaningful intersections, meetings and interactions that abolish exclusive truths and build trust. Dialogue through narratives is a fresh and leading way to work towards reconciliation.

Back to Top

Program Description

Israeli and Palestinian “change-agent” groups (e.g. social workers, journalists, grandmothers, artists, educators, social activists, etc.) participate in a long-term exploration of the individual and national narrative of the other. Over the course of several months, participants experience the parallel narrative module made up of trust-building sessions, historical workshops, visits to significant places in the history of the other and applying learning to their communities. The Narrative project has shown incredible results in breaking down stereotypes, increasing understanding and empathy and fostering willingness to participate in peace activities. It is featured in PCFF’s 2012 documentary film Two Sided Story, directed by Emmy award winner, Tor Ben Mayor.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

The ongoing Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Occupation continue to create barriers – both emotional and on the ground – between both societies. Israelis and Palestinians do not meet each other directly, but rather through the lens of the media and popular culture which choose to show violence and extremists from both sides. Decades of political and military conflict remain testaments that sustainable peace requires more than just diplomatic agreements.

The past several years in this region have been characterized by an absence and stalling of any political or diplomatic dialogue. Yet, on the heels of the Arab Spring, it has become clear that political progress in our region can be catalyzed by movements of people on the ground. Examples from neighboring countries has strengthened the Palestinian non-violent movement against the Occupation as witnessed in the massive Palestinian protests during Nakba Day. On the Israeli side, the government is forced to navigate a new context where power and violence don’t play a role. In addition, Israeli society is currently witnessing massive public protests that are mobilizing social justice issues in general and end of conflict issues in particular.

The PCFF's work is based on the proven principle that dialogue can foster positive change in societal values, viewpoints and relationships that are necessary to overcome pain that comes along with any conflict along the path of the peace process.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

To date, more than 700 Palestinians and Israelis have participated in the Parallel Narrative Experience (PNE) workshops and have spread our message of reconciliation in their communities. Lawyers, psychologists, students, bereaved families, women, and social activists were just some of the groups who participated. In 2015, we began working with alumni of our project. 100 alumni participated in a conference where they shared their struggles with dealing with their communities in these difficult times. They are working on joint projects aimed at increasing hope and trust in Palestinian-Israeli cooperation.


In 2018, four cohorts of the Parallel Narrative Experience completed the PNE modules, bring 203 Israelis and Palestinians together in an exploration of one another's cultural, national, and personal narratives.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

A recent evaluation was conducted on participants in the PCFF’s History through the Human Eye project, one of the organization’s prized projects which brings Israelis and Palestinians together over a period of time and engages them in trust building, personal and narrative sharing, as well as role playing and exploration of difficult and often painful subjects. The evaluation found that:

• 71% of all participants reported that participation in the program improved their level of trust and empathy for the other side.

• 68% of the participants reported that their participation in the program increased their levels of knowledge and acknowledgment of the other narrative.

• The program increased support for peace among 78% of the participants, according to their report and intensified belief in the possibility of reconciliation among 77% of the participants.

• The program increased the willingness to be more active in activities supporting peace building among 80% of the participants.

Back to Top

Women's Group - Engaging Women for Change

About

The Parents Circle’s Women’s Group was born out of a need to express the voice of the women in our organization. Its aim is to equip women from both sides of the conflict to acquire an authoritative voice and a real say in any future reconciliation process. The group was formed by some 20 women and has grown to more than 150 women.


Bereaved women pay the highest price of the conflict, and are seldom consulted in the decision to go to war, to have a cease fire, or to sign any peace agreements. Their experience highlights the sanctity of human life across the divide, and they have an important role to play in peacebuilding. However, as more women joined the PCFF Women’s Group and in light of the deteriorating social and political atmosphere in Israel and Palestine, the Parents Circle’s female members have expressed their desire to increase their leadership, dialogue, and peacebuilding capacities, in order to create a change in the public sphere.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The objective of this project is to increase the active participation of women in PCFF peace-building efforts. The majority of our Dialogue Meeting facilitators are male (70%). The PCFF Women’s Group members have a unique position in their societies as bereaved, with a connection to their respective national causes that cannot be questioned. Yet they have found ways to reconcile with the "other side", allowing them to present unpopular views and messages while maintaining attention and respect of wider communities who would otherwise refrain from participating

Back to Top

Program Description

The Women's Group's Engaging Women for Change project seeks to meet our goal to cultivate peace leaders from among our bereaved female membership. The program has a two-pronged approach to gender-based peacebuilding:


Trainings


The program engages bereaved women, from both sides of the conflict, in workshops focused on reconciliation, including bi-national and uni-national sessions.


Examples of topics addressed:


  • Personal and group identities
  • Relationships and power dynamics
  • Understanding the context and experiences that shape perceptions, beliefs, and behavior in times of conflict
  • The roles women play in conflict resolution
  • Training in facilitation and story-telling

Additional training activities include:


  • Group visits to sites of historical and current conflict in Israel and Palestine
  • Research projects on conflict resolution topics of participants choosing

Trainings are led by conflict resolution specialists.


Dialogue Meetings


Bereaved Israeli and Palestinian women co-lead and co-facilitate Dialogue Meetings by describing their personal loss and their choice of reconciliation and non-violence.


Attendees then participate in a facilitated discussion, including:


    • Personal narrative
    • A questions and answers period
    • Open discussion: Participants discuss their expectations, fears, as well as views towards peace and reconciliation
    • Feedback and evaluation of the program

Professional translation services are used to allow for a fluent and meaningful discussion


Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

The most recent outbreak of devastating violence has made it imperative to actively and persistently engage in reconciliation on a people-to-people level, addressing the “other” with respect, acknowledgment and understanding. This is in order to create sustainable peace from both the top down and bottom up. Both sides—Israelis and Palestinians-- view the other with distrust and skepticism and not as partners for making peace.

The PCFF Women's Group was born out of a need to make women’s voices heard in our programs and to bring a message of reconciliation to their families and communities. It has been shown that women are more competent facilitators of the reconciliation and dialogue process, and that their voice and empathy have more influence on the community and on future generations. Women, on both sides of the conflict, face significant obstacles in playing a role in reconciliation. They are marginalized from issues relating to the conflict as defense, militarism and political leadership are thought of as “masculine” roles and issues. Moreover, women hold fewer public and leadership positions on both sides of the conflict. On the Palestinian side, women’s roles are largely traditional, excluding women from the public sphere with few opportunities for engaging in public discourse or matters of external relations. The PCFF emphasizes the important role of women as participants and leaders in conflict resolution and peace building, as recognized in UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

In 2017, the Engaging Women for Change project accomplished the following towards its objectives:

  • PCFF was successful in establishing a strong, committed Learning Group made up of 16 bereaved Palestinian women. Thirteen (13) women completed the full program. The Learning Group conducted 22 workshops between April 2017 and January 2018. Throughout the workshops the participants proved themselves over and over again, converting their personal pain into powerful stories of redemption, critical thought, and reconciliation. These stories were sent out into their communities, either through studies the participants conducted or the ensuing Dialogue Meetings. Specifically, the women stated that the Learning Group's program was successful in:  imparting relevant and needed knowledge;
    creating a safe & enabling environment for individual/group growth and capacity building; and providing tools and skills needed for facilitation.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

The success of our Women's Group program can also be demonstrated by the visible active engagement of the dozens of female participants. For example, on September 28th, 2013, PCFF held a large public event at the Tel Aviv Cinemateque called "Neighbors - Women Creating Reconciliation".

200 Palestinians from the West Bank and around 1,500 Israelis came to this unique event that was held in the heart of Tel Aviv under the slogan "Let's Start from Talking".

At the event the women group of PCFF - bereaved mothers, sisters, wife and daughters - Israelis and Palestinians, presented the fruits of their year-long project funded by USAID, including a photography exhibition, art exhibition, dialogue encounters, and selling of homemade foods and hand works. Hundreds of Israelis and Palestinians came to take part, meet the other side and call for a change in the current situation and reaching a solution to the endless conflict.

Here are some of the highlights of the events (pictures available here):

"The Presence of the Void" - An exhibition of photographs created by 10 Palestinian and Israeli bereaved women. The project was led by the professional photographers: Vardi Kahana, Atta Awisat and Miki Kratsman. A video art (see below) created by the director Nurit Keidar about this exhibition was also presented at the event. The exhibition was presented at the Cinemateque from September 28 until October 14th, 2013.




"It Won't Stop Until We Talk" - 4 panels and dialogue encounters were held at hall 4 of the cinemateque, discussing the joint creation of these exhibitions, knowing the other side, the role of women in the reconciliation process, and life stories of Israelis and Palestinians. The hall was full in each of the panels by Israelis and Palestinians that were moved by what they heard and by the sense of hope they could feel. The panels were moderated by Linoy Bar-Gefen, Tallie Lipkin-Shahak and Ibtisam Mahmeed.

Back to Top

Young Ambassadors for Peace

About

The Young Ambassadors for Peace (YAP) program is an initiative to train and educate 25 bereaved Israelis and Palestinians ages 18-27 to become the next generation of peace leaders.


Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The purpose of working with young PCFF adults is to create a joint leadership, to be the next generation of the PCFF and to be able to address youth groups in Israel and in Palestine, and to deliver the message of reconciliation.


The project includes leadership workshops, learning about the Palestinian narrative as well as the Israeli narrative, instruction skills development and more.


Learn more at www.parentscirclefriends.org/young-ambassadors-peace/

Back to Top

Program Description

In recent years, the PCFF has been working with a cohort of bereaved Israeli and Palestinian young adults (ages 18-27) who have either been through our youth programs consistently, or exposed to PCFF messages and activities through their parents’ membership in the organization. The purpose of working with young PCFF adults is to create a joint leadership, to be the next generation of the PCFF and to be able to address youth groups in Israel and in Palestine, and to deliver the message of reconciliation.


A special program is established every year for youth groups, which includes leadership workshops, learning about the Palestinian narrative and the Israeli narrative, instruction skills development and more. Throughout the year and mostly in the summer months, young PCFF members take on the role of instructors in the youth summer camp and gatherings.
At the closing event of the program, the group presented their joint work at the #hope4change photo exhibition that reflected the process that they underwent through the program. The event took place at Jaffa Theater during May 2018.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

Today’s young adults in Israel and Palestine don’t have memories of a time before the violence. Bereaved youth have paid the highest price, and have grown up in the midst of violence, grief, and loss. They were born during either the first or second Intifada. They grew up being taught to hate the other side. And at some point during all of that, someone they loved was taken from them.


They are the future of the Parents Circle and the future of the peace movement in Israel and Palestine.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

During 2018, Israeli and Palestinian members of our Young Ambassadors for Peace (YAP) program took part in a photo project. They each received cameras and were asked to photograph things in their lives that give them hope and things they want to see change. 


The photos were compiled in an exhibit called “#Hope4Change,” which was first shown at the Arab Jewish Theater in Jaffa, and is currently being hosted at a high school in Tel Aviv.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

PCFF co-Directors, together with YAP co-Directors have set up a formative assessment and feedback process. 


Before their first meeting, the young adults filled in pre-program questionnaires which assessed the general make up, demographics and exposure of the participants to reconciliation and peacebuilding activities.

YAP co-Directors, together with PCFF educational team, have designed a questionnaire that will be administered at the end of the program year which will assess and evaluate the change in the participants’ perception of themselves and the “other”, their capacity and stand points over time. Based on our experience, we believe we will see positive results in the following areas and have set the following quantitative targets:



  • Strengthened Peace Leadership: Enhanced capacity, self-efficacy and ownership in peace leadership – 60% of participants will self-report an increase in peace leadership efficacy and capacity 

  • Amplification of  voices of non-violence in social media - 90% of youth will have been active on social media in the context of presenting messages of reconciliation around the conflict

  • Increased mutual understanding, empathy and trust – 76% of participants will self-report increased mutual understanding, empathy and trust of the other side (note:  we expect to see variations  on Palestinian and Israeli side) 

  • Increased public engagement in reconciliation -- 60% of participants will have been active in peacebuilding activities

  • Increased experience of hope– 80% of participants will have an increase in hope as a direct result of the project

  • Increase in readiness to be active in reconciliation work – 80% of participants will indicate willingness to participate in reconciliation and peacebuilding activities. 

  • Change of image from opponent to peace seeker – 85% of participants will self-report a change in self-image and image of the “other side” as a peace seeker rather than enemy.


Back to Top

Youth Program

About

The PCFF Youth Program is a unique dialogue group that brings together young Israelis and Palestinians (ages 14-18). The program engages approximately 50 Israeli and Palestinian bereaved youth over the course of a year through social games, dialogue workshops, physical activities, Arabic and Hebrew language lessons, and joint creative projects and expressions of their learning. These activities aim at building trust, as well as a sense of connection to one another regardless of religious, cultural, national, or ethnic ties among the youth. Because these youth are at an ideal stage of personal and social development for exposure to experiences that can challenge their prejudices and stereotypes, the youth program provides an ideal platform to empower, connect, and engage the next generation of leaders and policymakers.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

In light of the role that youth played in the outbreak and escalation of violence this year, it is even more important that Israeli and Palestinian youth are given the opportunity to form and strengthen beliefs in non-violence and for peace. Therefore, the Parents Circle - Families Forum's Youth Program seeks to cultivate the next generation and joint leadership to promote peace, by working within Palestinian and Israeli youth groups, who will continue to carry our message of reconciliation onwards.

Back to Top

Program Description

The PCFF Youth Program engage approximately 50 Israeli and Palestinian bereaved youth and their peers aged 14 to 18 over the course of a year.The content of the year-long program includes dialogue workshops, physical activities, social games, Hebrew and Arabic acquisition and joint, creative projects, leadership development and expressions of their learning. These activities aim at building trust among the youth and deepening their mutual understanding on the path to reconciliation.

The year-long program is made up of the following components:

1. Pre-Summer Program Dialogue Meetings – Prior to the summer program, the participating youth will be invited to attend two dialogue meetings – one unilateral meeting and one joint meeting. 

2. Summer Program – The 5-day summer program, which the PCFF has run for many years, is jointly held in Israel for approximately 50 youth.

3. Parent Engagement – On the last day of the summer program, PCFF invites parents to gain a deeper understanding for what their children have been experiencing and to learn how to support their children in this exploration and learning.


4. Post-Summer Session Joint Meeting – Our experience with the summer sessions show that the participants are eager to continue meeting following their incredibly moving summer program experience. In addition, the participants have initiated their own Facebook community in which they regularly share information and communicate about day-to-day life as well as political issues.

5. Bi-Monthly Encounters - Following the summer session, the youth maintain continuous contact with each other throughout the year during bi-monthly, joint, facilitated meetings. 

6. Evaluation and Conclusions

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

Israeli and Palestinian youth were born under the reality of a violent conflict and lack the perspective to develop an alternative, more humane view of the "other". This age bracket is of paramount importance as it is probably one of the last times that the majority will be open enough to reconsider their intellectual and emotional beliefs about their perceived “enemies”. Moreover, they are at a developmental stage that their personal and social development is ripe that if they are successfully exposed to experiences they can change their prejudices and stereotypes.

The ongoing strife within Israel and the Palestinian territories creates emotional and factual barriers between the two societies that inhibit the conflict resolution. Stemming from a belief in the power of person-to-person dialogue, and reconciliation through understanding the human side of the conflict, the work of the PCFF strives to defeat the continued violence by mitigating the hatred and misconceptions common on both sides of the conflict.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

In 2018, our summer program successfully engaged 30 Israeli and Palestinian young people in a 5-day summer program.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

In the summer of 2015, 40 Palestinian and Israeli youth, aged 14-18, joined by 8 counselors, held another successful summer youth program. Over four days, the youth engaged in games, discussions, site visits, outdoor activities, art projects and more. In light of the role that youth played in the outbreak and escalation of violence in 2015, it is even more important that Israeli and Palestinian youth are given the opportunity to form and strengthen beliefs in non-violence and for peace. As a direct result of participating in the program:



• 83% of participants showed an improvement in awareness of the other side’s need for respect and acceptance
• 87% or participants stated that the encounter helped them understand the other side’s point of view of the conflict

Back to Top

No grants received yet

×

Are you ready to take your giving circle from idea to reality?

Our Jewish Giving Circle Incubator will help you bring your giving circle to life. Whether you're 23 or 73, interested in social justice or Jewish innovation, and ready to give $50 or $10,000, we want you to join the Incubator. Apply today!

Applications are open until July 31st.

Apply Now
×