Arab Jewish Community Center

The Arab-Jewish Community Center works to increase intercultural cooperation, tolerance and trust between Arabs and Jews by implementing integrated peace education, activities, and programming and also empowers its culturally diverse community through social welfare and educational activities.
Location: Tel Aviv-Jaffa

Description

No description provided.
Wages of Change

About

Wages
of Change is a grassroots community initiative that will positively change the
overall socioeconomic standing and unemployment rate of women in Israel. We
will recruit 90 unemployed women from Tel Aviv-Jaffa to participate in a 10-month
professional training course in their choice of graphic design, bookkeeping, or
daycare instruction (30 participants in each track), certified by the Tel
Aviv-Jaffa Municipality. The activities involved in Wages of Change are 800
hours of training in one of three chosen vocational tracks; participation in 5
observational training trips; supplemental courses in language, economics, and
technology; and resume writing and interviewing workshops. Following course
completion, we give them the tools necessary to pass their state-mandated
course exams. Finally, after passing the final exam, we assist them in finding
sustainable employment in their field of expertise. Our goal is that at least
80% of participating women are successfully trained in their area of focus, at
least 80% of participating women pass state-mandated course exams in their
vocational track, and at least 70% of participating women obtain sustainable
employment in their field of training within the first 12 months after
graduation.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

Objective I: To provide unemployed and undereducated Arab women in Jaffa with the necessary knowledge, skills, and professional tools to enter, navigate, and succeed in Israel's workforce.

Objective II: To secure long-term job placement for unemployed Arab women in Jaffa as daycare instructors, graphic designers and bookkeepers.

Back to Top

Program Description

Target Population: Unemployed and undereducated Arab women living in Tel Aviv-Jaffa, ages 18-30.


Key Activities

Complete 800 hours of daycare training, 800 hours of graphic design training, and 800 hours of bookkeeping training over 10 months to prepare participants for hire upon program completion.

Complete 5 program trips per training track (15 in total) throughout the year for participants to engage in observational training.

Complete supplementary enrichment courses, including English and Hebrew language, technology and finances to provide participants with a versatile set of marketable and financial skills.

Implement 4 workshops on resume writing and interview tips.

Give letters of recommendation to our graduates from program staff on individual basis so participants have all the necessary professional tools to enter the workforce.

Cooperate with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality to secure job placements for graduates within 3 months of the program's completion.

Complete 50 hours on seminars and lectures on multicultural issues and discriminatory hiring practices in Israel, including laws against such practices and how to identify and confront discriminatory practices.

Conduct weekly meetings with social workers to help participants balance the challenges of the program with their personal lives. Meetings will continue after the participants find employment in order to assist them during the first few months of this transition.

Program director will meet with various organizations and companies to raise awareness of the issue of Arab female unemployment and promote fair hiring practices and affirmative action.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

Tel Aviv-Jaffa has the highest cost of living rate in the country, with roughly 45% of Israel's population living in the greater Tel Aviv-Jaffa metropolitan area. That means there are more than 8,100 people per square kilometer with an average monthly household gross income of roughly 20,500 NIS per family. That is 500% above the poverty line; the line under which 46% of Tel Aviv-Jaffa citizens (majorly from south Tel Aviv and Jaffa) are living below. Unfortunately, the hardest hit by this harsh reality are the women and children of Jaffa and south Tel Aviv, with 53% of children dropping out of school before completing the 12th grade.

The Arab-Jewish Community Center is situated within the most socioeconomically marginalized population of Tel Aviv-Jaffa; we are located in Ajami. While Ajami is part of the mixed city of Tel Aviv, the majority of its inhabitants are Arab families living below the poverty line, reflecting national statistics of Arab populations on the local level.

In Israel, more than 50% of Arab women and 60% of Arab children live below the poverty line. Only one fifth of Arab women participate in the labor force—leaving the Arab female unemployment rate at a staggering 80%. Of the entire Arab female population living in Israel a mere 45% graduate from high school. Of those holding a diploma or degree, more than 40% remain unemployed. While women as a whole constitute roughly 43% of the workforce population in Israel, they receive a lesser wage and have a much lower tenure rate than their male counterparts. The employment tenure rate of Arab working women in Israel is about 24% and Jewish working women is about 64%. Furthermore, while women hold nearly half of Israel's demographic, less than 20 women hold ministerial positions.

Although Israel is seen as relatively progressive, the aforementioned statistics are perpetual and unavoidable unless a workplace change occurs in Israel—specifically in the female sector. Having strong, self-sufficient, and respected female role models is crucial to an equitable future for Israel.

In Jaffa, the opportunity for female Arab employment is scarce, keeping the statistics at bay. This underrepresentation in the labor force and lack of engagement in policy-making processes is due to the fact that Arab women constitute the most marginalized and vulnerable minority of society. As part of a patriarchal culture whose traditional role is to remain in the home while men work, Arab women have very little opportunity for exposure to other cultures or way of life. Additionally, perpetual unemployment due to under-education and intrinsic discrimination bears negative social implications on the women's perception of others; on the way their children understand the necessity of gender equality, self-sufficiency, and contributing to the voice of civil society in Israel; and it creates resentment toward their local and national governments. Wages of Change reverses those negative social implications by providing tools for empowerment, independence, and success.

By entering the workforce, women are able to change their financial situation. In doing so, they change the financial situation of their families. This creates a positive spiral of progress for society. By gaining sustainable employment and changing the socioeconomic situation of their families, women begin to feel empowered. In feeling empowered, they are more inclined to contribute to the voice of civil society and engage in policy-making processes. This will change the sentiment toward their municipal and national governments. Feeling empowered will also change their outlook on life, their perception and feelings toward their Jewish/Arab counterparts, and the way they see themselves.

By seeing oneself in a positive light, one's attitude toward day-to-day activities and people shift. These empowered women will serve as rejuvenated role models for their daughters and young women they meet. This will effectively create a new generation of like-minded and empowered young women—a crucial piece to Israel's strong, vibrant and free civil society – that will see self-sufficiency and gender equality as realities they can advocate for and participate in.

Wages of Change differs from other programs in Israel due to our partnership with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality, which has pledged to guarantee employment for at least 70% of all Wages of Change graduates within 12 months of graduation.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Our
Wages of Change Program was developed out of our previously successful Al Amal
program. The AJCC’s Al Amal project, which ran from 2007-2011, successfully
trained Arab women from low socio-economic backgrounds as medical secretaries,
IT technicians, daycare instructors, and bookkeepers. Al Amal consistently
achieved an 85% rate of job placement for participants upon graduation.

We expect the same positive outcomes with Wages of Change.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

We will assess Wages of Change's overall success and effectiveness by the following:

  • Questionnaires and one-on-one meetings to measure each participant's sujective experience of gained independence, financial security and social inclusion.
  • Tracking to ensure a minimum of 80% of program participants pass state-mandated exams and receive a diploma.
  • Tracking to monitor and ensure that a minimum of 70% of program graduates secure sustainable employment within 6 months of graduation.
  • Tracking program participants for three years after graduation to assess levels of job retention.

Back to Top

Wages of Change

About

Wages
of Change is a grassroots community initiative that will positively change the
overall socioeconomic standing and unemployment rate of women in Israel. We
will recruit 90 unemployed women from Tel Aviv-Jaffa to participate in a 10-month
professional training course in their choice of graphic design, bookkeeping, or
daycare instruction (30 participants in each track), certified by the Tel
Aviv-Jaffa Municipality. The activities involved in Wages of Change are 800
hours of training in one of three chosen vocational tracks; participation in 5
observational training trips; supplemental courses in language, economics, and
technology; and resume writing and interviewing workshops. Following course
completion, we give them the tools necessary to pass their state-mandated
course exams. Finally, after passing the final exam, we assist them in finding
sustainable employment in their field of expertise. Our goal is that at least
80% of participating women are successfully trained in their area of focus, at
least 80% of participating women pass state-mandated course exams in their
vocational track, and at least 70% of participating women obtain sustainable
employment in their field of training within the first 12 months after
graduation.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

Objective I: To provide unemployed and undereducated Arab women in Jaffa with the necessary knowledge, skills, and professional tools to enter, navigate, and succeed in Israel's workforce.

Objective II: To secure long-term job placement for unemployed Arab women in Jaffa as daycare instructors, graphic designers and bookkeepers.

Back to Top

Program Description

Target Population: Unemployed and undereducated Arab women living in Tel Aviv-Jaffa, ages 18-30.


Key Activities

Complete 800 hours of daycare training, 800 hours of graphic design training, and 800 hours of bookkeeping training over 10 months to prepare participants for hire upon program completion.

Complete 5 program trips per training track (15 in total) throughout the year for participants to engage in observational training.

Complete supplementary enrichment courses, including English and Hebrew language, technology and finances to provide participants with a versatile set of marketable and financial skills.

Implement 4 workshops on resume writing and interview tips.

Give letters of recommendation to our graduates from program staff on individual basis so participants have all the necessary professional tools to enter the workforce.

Cooperate with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality to secure job placements for graduates within 3 months of the program's completion.

Complete 50 hours on seminars and lectures on multicultural issues and discriminatory hiring practices in Israel, including laws against such practices and how to identify and confront discriminatory practices.

Conduct weekly meetings with social workers to help participants balance the challenges of the program with their personal lives. Meetings will continue after the participants find employment in order to assist them during the first few months of this transition.

Program director will meet with various organizations and companies to raise awareness of the issue of Arab female unemployment and promote fair hiring practices and affirmative action.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

Tel Aviv-Jaffa has the highest cost of living rate in the country, with roughly 45% of Israel's population living in the greater Tel Aviv-Jaffa metropolitan area. That means there are more than 8,100 people per square kilometer with an average monthly household gross income of roughly 20,500 NIS per family. That is 500% above the poverty line; the line under which 46% of Tel Aviv-Jaffa citizens (majorly from south Tel Aviv and Jaffa) are living below. Unfortunately, the hardest hit by this harsh reality are the women and children of Jaffa and south Tel Aviv, with 53% of children dropping out of school before completing the 12th grade.

The Arab-Jewish Community Center is situated within the most socioeconomically marginalized population of Tel Aviv-Jaffa; we are located in Ajami. While Ajami is part of the mixed city of Tel Aviv, the majority of its inhabitants are Arab families living below the poverty line, reflecting national statistics of Arab populations on the local level.

In Israel, more than 50% of Arab women and 60% of Arab children live below the poverty line. Only one fifth of Arab women participate in the labor force—leaving the Arab female unemployment rate at a staggering 80%. Of the entire Arab female population living in Israel a mere 45% graduate from high school. Of those holding a diploma or degree, more than 40% remain unemployed. While women as a whole constitute roughly 43% of the workforce population in Israel, they receive a lesser wage and have a much lower tenure rate than their male counterparts. The employment tenure rate of Arab working women in Israel is about 24% and Jewish working women is about 64%. Furthermore, while women hold nearly half of Israel's demographic, less than 20 women hold ministerial positions.

Although Israel is seen as relatively progressive, the aforementioned statistics are perpetual and unavoidable unless a workplace change occurs in Israel—specifically in the female sector. Having strong, self-sufficient, and respected female role models is crucial to an equitable future for Israel.

In Jaffa, the opportunity for female Arab employment is scarce, keeping the statistics at bay. This underrepresentation in the labor force and lack of engagement in policy-making processes is due to the fact that Arab women constitute the most marginalized and vulnerable minority of society. As part of a patriarchal culture whose traditional role is to remain in the home while men work, Arab women have very little opportunity for exposure to other cultures or way of life. Additionally, perpetual unemployment due to under-education and intrinsic discrimination bears negative social implications on the women's perception of others; on the way their children understand the necessity of gender equality, self-sufficiency, and contributing to the voice of civil society in Israel; and it creates resentment toward their local and national governments. Wages of Change reverses those negative social implications by providing tools for empowerment, independence, and success.

By entering the workforce, women are able to change their financial situation. In doing so, they change the financial situation of their families. This creates a positive spiral of progress for society. By gaining sustainable employment and changing the socioeconomic situation of their families, women begin to feel empowered. In feeling empowered, they are more inclined to contribute to the voice of civil society and engage in policy-making processes. This will change the sentiment toward their municipal and national governments. Feeling empowered will also change their outlook on life, their perception and feelings toward their Jewish/Arab counterparts, and the way they see themselves.

By seeing oneself in a positive light, one's attitude toward day-to-day activities and people shift. These empowered women will serve as rejuvenated role models for their daughters and young women they meet. This will effectively create a new generation of like-minded and empowered young women—a crucial piece to Israel's strong, vibrant and free civil society – that will see self-sufficiency and gender equality as realities they can advocate for and participate in.

Wages of Change differs from other programs in Israel due to our partnership with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality, which has pledged to guarantee employment for at least 70% of all Wages of Change graduates within 12 months of graduation.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Our
Wages of Change Program was developed out of our previously successful Al Amal
program. The AJCC’s Al Amal project, which ran from 2007-2011, successfully
trained Arab women from low socio-economic backgrounds as medical secretaries,
IT technicians, daycare instructors, and bookkeepers. Al Amal consistently
achieved an 85% rate of job placement for participants upon graduation.

We expect the same positive outcomes with Wages of Change.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

We will assess Wages of Change's overall success and effectiveness by the following:

  • Questionnaires and one-on-one meetings to measure each participant's sujective experience of gained independence, financial security and social inclusion.
  • Tracking to ensure a minimum of 80% of program participants pass state-mandated exams and receive a diploma.
  • Tracking to monitor and ensure that a minimum of 70% of program graduates secure sustainable employment within 6 months of graduation.
  • Tracking program participants for three years after graduation to assess levels of job retention.

Back to Top

Wages of Change

About

Wages
of Change is a grassroots community initiative that will positively change the
overall socioeconomic standing and unemployment rate of women in Israel. We
will recruit 90 unemployed women from Tel Aviv-Jaffa to participate in a 10-month
professional training course in their choice of graphic design, bookkeeping, or
daycare instruction (30 participants in each track), certified by the Tel
Aviv-Jaffa Municipality. The activities involved in Wages of Change are 800
hours of training in one of three chosen vocational tracks; participation in 5
observational training trips; supplemental courses in language, economics, and
technology; and resume writing and interviewing workshops. Following course
completion, we give them the tools necessary to pass their state-mandated
course exams. Finally, after passing the final exam, we assist them in finding
sustainable employment in their field of expertise. Our goal is that at least
80% of participating women are successfully trained in their area of focus, at
least 80% of participating women pass state-mandated course exams in their
vocational track, and at least 70% of participating women obtain sustainable
employment in their field of training within the first 12 months after
graduation.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

Objective I: To provide unemployed and undereducated Arab women in Jaffa with the necessary knowledge, skills, and professional tools to enter, navigate, and succeed in Israel's workforce.

Objective II: To secure long-term job placement for unemployed Arab women in Jaffa as daycare instructors, graphic designers and bookkeepers.

Back to Top

Program Description

Target Population: Unemployed and undereducated Arab women living in Tel Aviv-Jaffa, ages 18-30.


Key Activities

Complete 800 hours of daycare training, 800 hours of graphic design training, and 800 hours of bookkeeping training over 10 months to prepare participants for hire upon program completion.

Complete 5 program trips per training track (15 in total) throughout the year for participants to engage in observational training.

Complete supplementary enrichment courses, including English and Hebrew language, technology and finances to provide participants with a versatile set of marketable and financial skills.

Implement 4 workshops on resume writing and interview tips.

Give letters of recommendation to our graduates from program staff on individual basis so participants have all the necessary professional tools to enter the workforce.

Cooperate with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality to secure job placements for graduates within 3 months of the program's completion.

Complete 50 hours on seminars and lectures on multicultural issues and discriminatory hiring practices in Israel, including laws against such practices and how to identify and confront discriminatory practices.

Conduct weekly meetings with social workers to help participants balance the challenges of the program with their personal lives. Meetings will continue after the participants find employment in order to assist them during the first few months of this transition.

Program director will meet with various organizations and companies to raise awareness of the issue of Arab female unemployment and promote fair hiring practices and affirmative action.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

Tel Aviv-Jaffa has the highest cost of living rate in the country, with roughly 45% of Israel's population living in the greater Tel Aviv-Jaffa metropolitan area. That means there are more than 8,100 people per square kilometer with an average monthly household gross income of roughly 20,500 NIS per family. That is 500% above the poverty line; the line under which 46% of Tel Aviv-Jaffa citizens (majorly from south Tel Aviv and Jaffa) are living below. Unfortunately, the hardest hit by this harsh reality are the women and children of Jaffa and south Tel Aviv, with 53% of children dropping out of school before completing the 12th grade.

The Arab-Jewish Community Center is situated within the most socioeconomically marginalized population of Tel Aviv-Jaffa; we are located in Ajami. While Ajami is part of the mixed city of Tel Aviv, the majority of its inhabitants are Arab families living below the poverty line, reflecting national statistics of Arab populations on the local level.

In Israel, more than 50% of Arab women and 60% of Arab children live below the poverty line. Only one fifth of Arab women participate in the labor force—leaving the Arab female unemployment rate at a staggering 80%. Of the entire Arab female population living in Israel a mere 45% graduate from high school. Of those holding a diploma or degree, more than 40% remain unemployed. While women as a whole constitute roughly 43% of the workforce population in Israel, they receive a lesser wage and have a much lower tenure rate than their male counterparts. The employment tenure rate of Arab working women in Israel is about 24% and Jewish working women is about 64%. Furthermore, while women hold nearly half of Israel's demographic, less than 20 women hold ministerial positions.

Although Israel is seen as relatively progressive, the aforementioned statistics are perpetual and unavoidable unless a workplace change occurs in Israel—specifically in the female sector. Having strong, self-sufficient, and respected female role models is crucial to an equitable future for Israel.

In Jaffa, the opportunity for female Arab employment is scarce, keeping the statistics at bay. This underrepresentation in the labor force and lack of engagement in policy-making processes is due to the fact that Arab women constitute the most marginalized and vulnerable minority of society. As part of a patriarchal culture whose traditional role is to remain in the home while men work, Arab women have very little opportunity for exposure to other cultures or way of life. Additionally, perpetual unemployment due to under-education and intrinsic discrimination bears negative social implications on the women's perception of others; on the way their children understand the necessity of gender equality, self-sufficiency, and contributing to the voice of civil society in Israel; and it creates resentment toward their local and national governments. Wages of Change reverses those negative social implications by providing tools for empowerment, independence, and success.

By entering the workforce, women are able to change their financial situation. In doing so, they change the financial situation of their families. This creates a positive spiral of progress for society. By gaining sustainable employment and changing the socioeconomic situation of their families, women begin to feel empowered. In feeling empowered, they are more inclined to contribute to the voice of civil society and engage in policy-making processes. This will change the sentiment toward their municipal and national governments. Feeling empowered will also change their outlook on life, their perception and feelings toward their Jewish/Arab counterparts, and the way they see themselves.

By seeing oneself in a positive light, one's attitude toward day-to-day activities and people shift. These empowered women will serve as rejuvenated role models for their daughters and young women they meet. This will effectively create a new generation of like-minded and empowered young women—a crucial piece to Israel's strong, vibrant and free civil society – that will see self-sufficiency and gender equality as realities they can advocate for and participate in.

Wages of Change differs from other programs in Israel due to our partnership with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality, which has pledged to guarantee employment for at least 70% of all Wages of Change graduates within 12 months of graduation.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Our
Wages of Change Program was developed out of our previously successful Al Amal
program. The AJCC’s Al Amal project, which ran from 2007-2011, successfully
trained Arab women from low socio-economic backgrounds as medical secretaries,
IT technicians, daycare instructors, and bookkeepers. Al Amal consistently
achieved an 85% rate of job placement for participants upon graduation.

We expect the same positive outcomes with Wages of Change.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

We will assess Wages of Change's overall success and effectiveness by the following:

  • Questionnaires and one-on-one meetings to measure each participant's sujective experience of gained independence, financial security and social inclusion.
  • Tracking to ensure a minimum of 80% of program participants pass state-mandated exams and receive a diploma.
  • Tracking to monitor and ensure that a minimum of 70% of program graduates secure sustainable employment within 6 months of graduation.
  • Tracking program participants for three years after graduation to assess levels of job retention.

Back to Top

Wages of Change

About

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

To provide unemployed and undereducated women in Tel Aviv-Jaffa with the necessary knowledge, skills, and professional tools to enter, navigate, and succeed in Israel's workforce in order to empower and positively change the situation of women in Israel.

Back to Top

Program Description

Wages of Change is a grassroots community initiative that will positively change the overall socioeconomic standing and unemployment rate of women in Israel. We will recruit 90 unemployed women from Tel Aviv-Jaffa to participate in a 10-month professional training course in their choice of graphic design, bookkeeping, or daycare instruction (30 participants in each track), certified by the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality. The activities involved in Wages of Change are 800 hours of training in one of three chosen vocational tracks; participation in 5 observational training trips; supplemental courses in language, economics, and technology; and resume writing and interviewing workshops. Following course completion, we give them the tools necessary to pass their state-mandated course exams. Finally, after passing the final exam, we assist them in finding sustainable employment in their field of expertise. Our goal is that at least 80% of participating women are successfully trained in their area of focus, at least 80% of participating women pass state-mandated course exams in their vocational track, and at least 70% of participating women obtain sustainable employment in their field of training within the first 12 months after graduation.

By increasing female employment rates, a more inclusive, gender equal and democratic Israel will emerge. By providing women with the guidance and tools to become self-sustaining and socially included, they become greater role models for their children—especially daughters—fostering a more egalitarian mindset for growth among our country's youth. They also become role models for other women in their neighborhood and community at large. This grassroots socioeconomic program enables women to reach their full potential in contributing to the voice of the civil sector, thus securing an enabling environment for a vibrant, strong and free civil society in Israel.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

Tel Aviv-Jaffa has the highest cost of living rate in the country, with roughly 45% of Israel's population living in the greater Tel Aviv-Jaffa metropolitan area. That means there are more than 8,100 people per square kilometer with an average monthly household gross income of roughly 20,500 NIS per family. That is 500% above the poverty line; the line under which 46% of Tel Aviv-Jaffa citizens (majorly from south Tel Aviv and Jaffa) are living below. Unfortunately, the hardest hit by this harsh reality are the women and children of Jaffa and south Tel Aviv, with 53% of children dropping out of school before completing the 12th grade.

The Arab-Jewish Community Center is situated within the most socioeconomically marginalized population of Tel Aviv-Jaffa; we are located in Ajami. While Ajami is part of the mixed city of Tel Aviv, the majority of its inhabitants are Arab families living below the poverty line, reflecting national statistics of Arab populations on the local level.

In Israel, more than 50% of Arab women and 60% of Arab children live below the poverty line. Only one fifth of Arab women participate in the labor force—leaving the Arab female unemployment rate at a staggering 80%. Of the entire Arab female population living in Israel a mere 45% graduate from high school. Of those holding a diploma or degree, more than 40% remain unemployed. While women as a whole constitute roughly 43% of the workforce population in Israel, they receive a lesser wage and have a much lower tenure rate than their male counterparts. The employment tenure rate of Arab working women in Israel is about 24% and Jewish working women is about 64%. Furthermore, while women hold nearly half of Israel's demographic, less than 20 women hold ministerial positions.

Although Israel is seen as relatively progressive, the aforementioned statistics are perpetual and unavoidable unless a workplace change occurs in Israel—specifically in the female sector. Having strong, self-sufficient, and respected female role models is crucial to an equitable future for Israel.

In Jaffa, the opportunity for female Arab employment is scarce, keeping the statistics at bay. This underrepresentation in the labor force and lack of engagement in policy-making processes is due to the fact that Arab women constitute the most marginalized and vulnerable minority of society. As part of a patriarchal culture whose traditional role is to remain in the home while men work, Arab women have very little opportunity for exposure to other cultures or way of life. Additionally, perpetual unemployment due to under-education and intrinsic discrimination bears negative social implications on the women's perception of others; on the way their children understand the necessity of gender equality, self-sufficiency, and contributing to the voice of civil society in Israel; and it creates resentment toward their local and national governments. Wages of Change reverses those negative social implications by providing tools for empowerment, independence, and success.

By entering the workforce, women are able to change their financial situation. In doing so, they change the financial situation of their families. This creates a positive spiral of progress for society. By gaining sustainable employment and changing the socioeconomic situation of their families, women begin to feel empowered. In feeling empowered, they are more inclined to contribute to the voice of civil society and engage in policy-making processes. This will change the sentiment toward their municipal and national governments. Feeling empowered will also change their outlook on life, their perception and feelings toward their Jewish/Arab counterparts, and the way they see themselves.

By seeing oneself in a positive light, one's attitude toward day-to-day activities and people shift. These empowered women will serve as rejuvenated role models for their daughters and young women they meet. This will effectively create a new generation of like-minded and empowered young women—a crucial piece to Israel's strong, vibrant and free civil society – that will see self-sufficiency and gender equality as realities they can advocate for and participate in.

Wages of Change differs from other programs in Israel due to our partnership with the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality, which has pledged to guarantee employment for at least 70% of all Wages of Change graduates within 12 months of graduation.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Our
Wages of Change Program was developed out of our previously successful Al Amal
program. The AJCC’s Al Amal project, which ran from 2007-2011, successfully
trained Arab women from low socio-economic backgrounds as medical secretaries,
IT technicians, daycare instructors, and bookkeepers. Al Amal consistently
achieved an 85% rate of job placement for participants upon graduation.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

We will assess Wages of Change's overall success and effectiveness by the following:

  • Questionnaires and one-on-one meetings to measure each participant's sujective experience of gained independence, financial security and social inclusion.
  • Tracking to ensure a minimum of 80% of program participants pass state-mandated exams and receive a diploma.
  • Tracking to monitor and ensure that a minimum of 70% of program graduates secure sustainable employment within 6 months of graduation.
  • Tracking program participants for three years after graduation to assess levels of job retention.

These should:

- Ensure and track that at least 80% of program graduates pass State-mandated exams and receive a diploma.

- Monitor and ensure that at least 80% of program graduates secure employment within 6 months of graduation.

We will track program participants for a period of three years after graduation through telephone interviews in order to assess whether or not these women successfully retain their jobs. We will continue our current fundraising strategy so that we can run the program annually and recruit a new cohort of unemployed Arab women each year. Future "Wages of Change" programming will be adjusted and amended in accordance to participant feedback and satisfaction with program activities, curriculum and staff.

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