Israel America Academic Exchange

The mission of Academic Exchange is to educate academics and policy intellectuals worldwide to sympathetic understanding of Israel's strategic environment, challenges and opportunities. -- education which will be reflected in participants' teaching, writing and policy influence.
Location: Beverly Hills , CA
Year founded: 2009

Description

Drew Faust, the President of Harvard University said, “University is about education that shapes the future.”

Our ambition is to ensure that future will be robust in its sympathy for Israel. To achieve this end we mount comprehensive missions to Israel followed by robust adjunct programming to build community among our alumni and to extend the impact of the missions. We believe deeply that without follow-up the impact of the missions, however profound, must rapidly dissipate. We are looking for a grant to permit us capitalize on an important follow-up opportunity.


Federalism in the Middle-East

About

This program is designed to explore the application of notions of federalism, asymmetric federalism, and confederation to contemporary Mideast conflicts. It aims to bring together academic specialists in federalism from different disciplines with experts and practitioners focused on particular regional conflicts. Our initial objective is to examine the relevance of federalism for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and then to apply these findings to policy recommendations, more closely examined academic analysis, or both.


Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The mission of this program is to explore new and creative
solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This project furthermore provides the
opportunity for influential Academic Exchange alumni to coalesce into a community by contributing their time and expertise to enhancing Israel's strategic position.

Back to Top

Program Description

As above, this project brings together Academic Exchange mission alumni with expertise in international relations and international law to explore new and creative solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. There are a series of 3 steps in this project:

1. A small gathering of experts at the Stanford University Freeman Spogli Institute

2. The publication of findings from the Stanford gathering in the national security web publication, Lawfare. At that time, findings of the Stanford conference will be commented on by Shai Feldman, Khalil Shikaki and Abdel Monem Said Aly,representing (respectively) an Israeli, Palestinian and non-Palestinian Arab perspective.

3. Presentation of the findings to an extended gathering of 140 AE alumni at a retreat in June 2017.

Participants in (step 1), the Stanford University gathering include:

Steve Krasner:Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution Department of Political Science at Stanford University, and former Director of Policy Planning for the Department of State

Judy Goldstein: Chair of the Department of Political Science; Janet M. Peck Professor in International Communication; Kaye University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and Professor of Political Science at Stanford University

Benjamin Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, where he
is the Research Director in Public Law, and Co-Director of the Harvard
Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security

David Lake: Gerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and
Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of California,
San Diego; President of the American Political Science Association

Peter Katzenstein: Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies at Cornell University

Mila Versteeg: Professor of Law and Director of the Human Rights Program at the University of Virginia

Lisa Blaydes: Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University

This group will present their findings at a gathering of 140 AE mission alumni in August.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

The Israel-Palestinian conflict is deeply impacted. The ongoing violence weakens support for Israel internationally as well among significant aspects of the population in this country. It is a priority to explore creative solutions that will satisfy Palestinian aspirations while preserving Israeli security.

In addition to the potential benefit for Israel this project offers an important opportunity to strengthen community and deepen support for Israel among the network of influential academics and policy intellectuals engaged with Academic Exchange.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Academic Exchange (AE) was conceived as "Operation Birthright for college professors" and incorporated in 2009. Since then AE has brought to Israel 420 leading scholars of international relations and international law, established working partnerships with academic institutions of the first rank, and currently operates 6 annual missions to Israel as well as extensive adjunct and follow-on activities.

AE targets the most influential senior and rising junior faculty and policy intellectuals from around the world as well as the editors of the leading journals of international affairs and important academic publishing houses. A sampling of past participants includes Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, William Kirby, Harvard Distinguished Professor and former Dean of the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, James Simpson, Chair of the English Department at Harvard, Kenneth Taylor, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Stanford, Simon Hix, Head of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics, Steve Wilkinson, Chair of the Department of Political Science at Yale, Judith Goldstein, Chair of the Department of Political Science at Stanford, Rebecca Johnson, Dean of the Marine Corps War College, Kenneth Taylor, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Stanford and Wang Jisi, Head of the School of International Relations at Beijing University. Approximately 50% of AE's alumni are current or prior chair of their academic department; 24% are tenured junior faculty. 17% are non-tenured. (A complete list of AE mission alumni is available here: www.academicexchange.com/participants/)

AE solicits nominations from mission alumni and selects invitees for their current or prospective influence in the policy intellectual community, as well as for geographic and gender balance. This selection is made by Chairman of the AE academic board, Steve Krasner, Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations; Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and the Hoover Institute, Provost in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University and former Director of Policy Planning for the US State Department.

Post-missions, AE mounts extensive programming to sustain and deepen alumni engagement with each other, with Israeli colleagues and with Academic Exchange.

This post-mission programming includes:

1. Conferences and Tier 2 (alumni) Missions

A complete list of previous conferences is available here: http://academicexchange.com/conferences/

2. Reunions and Speaker Tours

3. Preparation, Collation and Distribution of Curriculum

Alumni frequently wish to incorporate study of Israeli into their courses, but are hampered by lack of curricular material. Under the guidance of Asher Susser and with the participation of the AE academic board, AE develops and distributes curriculum and bibliographic material. This curricular material is available on request.

4. Lawfare

To provide a vehicle for consistent contact with our alumni and to deepen their knowledge of Israel and the Middle-East, AE entered a partnership with Lawfare: https://lawfareblog.com, a web publication for the national security community, drawing 95,000 unique visitors/month and 450,000 page views in January 2017 alone.






Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

The key to AE's organizational success has been the ability to constitute itself as a learning organization.

The executive director and AE's Academic Executive (Goldstein, Krasner, Haggard, Kupchan, Waxman and Wittes -- Please see bios below under "key personnel") are in nearly continual contact and work collaboratively to consider recruitment strategy, plan mission schedules, design adjunct follow-up programming, to review these programs for effectiveness and make adjustments for the future.

AE hired Yigal Rosen, Senior Research Scientist at Harvard University and Vice-Provost for Advances in Learning and former head of assessment for Taglit-Birthright, to design and conduct pre and post mission surveys after every mission, as well as a survey of all mission alumni to be administered annually through the life of the program. Yigal was joined in this effort by Judy Goldstein and by Tova Katz, program officer of the Jacobson Family Foundation. The results of these surveys directly influence the planning of subsequent missions and adjunct programming.

AE hired two graduate students to create and maintain a data base of all alumni, tracking their academic and policy appointments, research and publications, and this data base is continually reviewed to guide AE's participant selection and the planning of adjunct programming.

By most conventional indices of success, AE has been wildly successful. Measured against the scale and urgency of the task, we're just getting started.

Back to Top

Retreat for AE European Alumni

About


In October 2018, Academic Exchange will mount a retreat in England for English and European alumni of the AE Israel missions. Responsibility for the planning of this retreat has been assumed by 4 AE alumni: Peter Trubowitz (Chair of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics), Lesley Vinjamuri (Chair of the Center for Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS, University of London), James Davis (Director of the Department of Political Science at St. Gallen) and Gunther Hellman (Professor of International Relations at Goethe University).

The retreat is already fully subscribed and the following people have confirmed their attendance:

Mathias Albert: Professor of Political Science at Bielefeld University in Germany

Pierre Allan: Professor of Political Science at the University of Geneva

Richard Caplan: Professor of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University

Lars-Erik Cederman: Professor of International Conflict Research at ETH Zurich

Mitat Celikpala: Professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University in Turkey

James W. Davis: Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Institute of Political Science at St. Gallen

Dirk De Bièvre: Associate Professor of International Politics at the University of Antwerp

Sujit Dutta: M K Gandhi Chair Nelson Mandela Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Jamia Millia Islamia

Anthony Dworkin: Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations

Filip Ejdus: Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Global Insecurities Centre, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS), University of Bristol

Richard English: Professor of Politics at Queen's University Belfast, and Distinguished Professorial Fellow in the George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice in Northern Ireland

Adam Fagan: Professor of European Politics and head of School, Queen Mary University of London

Mervyn Frost: Professor of International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

Robin Geiss: Professor of International Law and Security at the University of Glasgow

Joshua Geltzer: Executive Director and Visiting Professor of Law at the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, Georgetown University Law Center

Tom Grant: Professor of Law at the University of Cambridge, England

Carola Groppe: Professor of Educational Science at the Helmut Schmidt University in Germany

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sally Krause Distinguished Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, Director of the Korea-Pacific Program (KPP) in the Graduate School of International Relations at Pacific Studies at UCSD

Gunther Hellmann: Professor of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

Anders Henriksen: Associate Professor of Public International Law and Director of the Center for International Law and Justice at the University of Copenhagen School of Law

Simon Hix: Professor of European and Comparative Politics and Former Head of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics

Stephanie Hofmann: Associate Professor in Political Science at the Graduate Institute Geneva in Switzerland

Devika Hovell: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics

Chris Inglis: Visiting Professor of Cyber Studies at the United States Naval Academy and Venture Partner at Paladin Capital; former Deputy Director and Senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency

Desmond King: Andrew W Mellon Professor of American Government at the University of Oxford

Ivan Krastev: Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Bulgaria

Charles Kupchan: Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; former Special Assistant to the President for National Security

Walter Mattli: Fellow in Politics at St. John's College and Professor of International Political Economy in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University

Hartmut Mayer: Fellow and Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at St. Peter`s College, University of Oxford and Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe in Bologna

Peter Mayer: Professor of International Relations at the Institute for Intercultural and International Studies at the University of Bremen

Alex Mills: Professor of Public and Private International Law at the University College London

James Morrison: Assistant Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics

Kalypso Nicolaidis: Professor of International Relations and Director of the European Studies Centre at Oxford

Andra Laszlo Pap: Associate Professor at Eötvös University (ELTE) Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media and Communication; Research Chair at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Legal Studies in Budapest; Project manager of the Hungarian Focal Point of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights; staff editor of International and European Public Law Review

Barry Posen: Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program

Marissa Quie: Lecturer and Researcher in Political Science at the University of Cambridge

Gina Reinhardt: Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Government at the University of Essex

Louise Richardson: Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of St. Andrews

Stephanie Rickard: Associate Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics

Simon Saunders: Professor of Philosophy of Physics at the University of Oxford

Duncan Snidal: Professor of International Relations, Director of Research Training and Fellow of Nuffield College at Oxford

Stephan Stetter: Professor of Global Politics and Conflict Studies at Universitat der Bundeswehr

Chrisitian Tams: Professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow

Kimberley Trapp: Professor of Public International Law at the University College London

Antonios Tzanakopoulos: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the University of Oxford

Kivanc Ulusoy: Associate Professor of Political Science at Istanbul University

Guglielmo Verdirame: Professor of International Law at King’s College London

Leslie Vinjamuri: Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London

Nicholas Wheeler: Professor of International Relations and Director of the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security at the University of Birmingham

Jürgen Wilzewski: Professor of International Relations and Political Science at the University of Kaiserlautern

Ben Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, Research Director in Public Law, Co-Director of the Harvard Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security and Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare

Reinhard Wolf: Professor of International Relations and chair in International Relations and World Order Issues in the Department of Political Science at Goethe University in Frankfurt

Ayşe Zarakol: University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Cambridge

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

AE's 8 day missions to Israel have demonstrated significant
impact on the attitudes of participants, but follow up programming is essential if this impact is to be sustained and deepened over time. Further and crucially, follow up programming establishes a sense of community among mission alumni, sustaining their altered point of view in support of Israel and establishing them as a cohesive and effective counterweight in a larger and generally hostile academic community,

In 2017 AE mounted the following adjunct programs for mission alumni:

9/1/16: Alumni reunion at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association (coordinated by AE alumnus, Steve Krasner)
9/21/16: Presentation for Los Angeles based alumni by Professor Eugene Volokh
11/17/16: Gathering for New York based alumni with Dani Dayan, Israel Consul General (coordinated by AE alumnus, Matt Waxman)
11/20/16: Presentation for DC based alumni with Professor Asher Susser, former Director of the Dayan Center for Middle-East Studies at Tel Aviv University (coordinated by AE alumnus, Ben Wittes)
2/16/17: Conference at Stanford University on Federalism in the Middle-East (coordinated by AE alumni Mila Versteeg and Ben Wittes)
2/2717: Presentation for Washington DC based alumni with Israeli journalist, Aluf Benn (coordinated by AE alumnus Ben Wittes)
5/15/17 Conference for Chinese Alumni in Partnership with the Harvard China Fund in Shanghai (coordinated by AE alumni Bill Kirby, Chair of the Harvard China Fund, former Dean of Arts and Sciences at Harvard, and Wang Jisi, Chair of the Department of International Relations at Beijing University)
June 4-6, 2017 -- Alumni Retreat in Ojai, California (coordinated by Keren Yarhi-Milo (Princeton), Kenneth Schultz (Stanford) and Jon Pevehouse (Wisconsin). 120 AE alumni attended the retreat at their own expense.

Of these programs, the most effective and cost-efficient was the retreat for mission alumni. 120 former mission participants attended at their own expense.

In 2018 AE plans to mount a retreat in England for AE's English and European mission alumni. Going forward, AE intends to establish the retreat as an annual event, alternating between Europe and the United States.



Back to Top

Program Description

AE European Alumni Retreat

October 14-16 2018

Wilton Park, UK

Proposed Panels, Abstracts, and Participants

  • The Western Liberal (Dis)Order and the Middle East
  • Authoritarianism and Geopolitics in the Levante
  • The Iranian Nuclear Deal Three Years On
  • Identity, Migration, and Diaspora
  • Bottom-Up Approaches to Conflict Mitigation

Patterns of conflict and cooperation in the Middle East have always been critically affected by overarching systemic processes such as the “superpower rivalry” during the Cold War or multilateral, mostly Western initiatives aimed at building bridges between conflicting parties in the region. Today, mounting internal problems in Europe and America and worsening EU-US relations in the Trump era pose new challenges for a region in flux. How will the West’s preoccupation with internal matters impact Western resolve and strategic ties and relations within the Middle East and Persian Gulf? Should we expect Russian and China to play a more active and central role in the region’s politics and if so, with what consequences? Will regional powers such as Iran be freer to exercise power and influence in the region? This panel will examine these and other questions concerning the future of the Middle East at a time of Western disorder.

Chair: Peter Trubowitz: Professor of International Relations and Head of International Relations Department at the London School of Economics and Director of the LSE’s US Centre

Panelists:

Charles Kupchan: Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; former Special Assistant to the President for National Security

Barry Posen: Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program

Ngaire Woods: Founding Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government and Professor of Global Economic Governance at Oxford University (TBC)

From Israel’s strategic point of view its neighborhood is shaped by more or less authoritarian powers and fairly fluid coalitions – perhaps more so than ever before. Authoritarianism is more clearly visible in Turkey and Egypt, two relatively reliable partners in the old days. What does the rise of authoritarianism mean for the dynamics of war and peace (and coalition building) in the region? How do patterns of intrastate and interstate violence affect domestic stability in key regional states? How is Israel positioning itself vis-à-vis these external dynamics – and to what extent can it influence these events? How do these developments affect the relationship between Europe (and the EU in particular) and Israel?

Chair: Gunther Hellmann: Professor of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

Panelists:Lisa Anderson: James T. Shotwell Professor Emerita of International Relations at Columbia University (TBC)

Nadav Eyal: Chief International Correspondent – Israel Channel 10

Soli Ozel: Professor of International Relations at Istanbul's Kadir Has University

Ayse Zarakol: University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Cambridge

In July 2015, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) between Iran, the P5+1, and the EU was announced. Have the signatories to the JCPOA lived up to their international obligations and commitments?How far apart are America and Europe in their respective judgments about whether Iran is fulfilling its obligations under the JCOPA? Have Israel’s and the Gulf States’ fears that the nuclear deal would shift the balance of power in the region toward Iran materialized? What are the prospects of the nuclear deal going forward? This panel will look back on the JCPOA, the subsequent challenges to it in the region and beyond, and the road ahead.

Chair: Leslie Vinjamuri: Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London

Panelists:

Ellie Geranmayeh: Senior Policy Fellow for the Middle East and North Africa Programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations (TBC)

Steve Erlanger: London Bureau Chief for the New York Times

Steve Krasner:Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations; Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, andDeputy Director of the Freeman Spogli Institute (TBC)

Gen (ret.) Eli Ben Meir: Former Chief Intelligence Officer of the IDF

Wendy Sherman: Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and Senior Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (TBC)

Europe’s “migration crisis” has re-ignited identity politics and created a backlash across Europe.Has the migration crisis created new impetus for European leaders to back new initiatives aimed at stabilizing the Middle East?Will this backlash accelerate patterns of Jewish out-immigration from Europe to Israel and in turn, dampen the rise in Israeli migration to Germany, France and other European destinations in recent decades? How has Europe’s preoccupation with countering terror shaped political responses to migration across the continent? This panel will explore the political dynamics of migration between Europe and the Middle East and consider their implications for Israel and the Jewish diaspora.

Chair:James Davis: Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Institute of Political Science at St. Gallen (TBC)

Panelists:Dani Kranz: Stern Centre for Jewish Studies Berlin-Brandenberg

Kalypso Nicolaidis: Professor of International Relations and Director of the European Studies Centre at Oxford

Uzi Rebhun: Demographer in the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry at Hebrew University

As the prospects for an Oslo-style grand bargain recede, attention has again focused on the role that economic approaches might play in conflict resolution. The range of possible nodes around which cooperation could form are numerous, from water and power agreements, public and private investments in the West Bank and Gaza, a deepening of cross-border flows of capital, goods, services and people, and projects designed to effectively strengthen the Palestinian state in order to mitigate economic grievances. As a long liberal tradition in international relations suggests, growing economic interdependence may not only create vested interests in peace but build altogether new constituencies for it. This panel considers the prospects and limits of such approaches.

Chair: Steph Haggard: Lawrence and Sally Krause Distinguished Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, Director of the Korea-Pacific Program (KPP) in the Graduate School of International Relations at Pacific Studies at UCSD

Panelists: Lars-Erik Cederman: Professor of International Conflict Research at ETH Zurich (TBC)

Uri Shamir: Professor Emeritus of Environmental, Water and Agricultural Engineering at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House (TBC)

Lina Khatib: Head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House (TBC)

Anthony Dworkin: Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations (TBC)

Ron Schatzberg: Reserve Colonel in the IDF and Senior Advisor at the Economic Cooperation Foundation

6) Stresses on the International Law System and their Security Implications

Over the past few years, the European Union has seen one of its most powerful members head for the exits and financial crisis among its other members. Europe has also seen a giant influx of refugees from the Middle East and elsewhere, with which its member states have struggled to cope. Major terrorist operations have stressed international law enforcement cooperation. Russia has seized territory by force from Ukrain. And the United States has elected Donald Trump, who has withdrawn from the Paris Climate Agreement and brought into doubt key expectations of U.S. allies and partners. How is the international law system coping with these serial pressures and to what extent will they effect developments in the Middle East? How are they affecting security cooperation between countries whose security is necessarily intertwined? To what extent is the fragmentation of the EU limiting the ability and the leverage of its member states to mount coherent foreign policy, either separately or jointly. More generally, to what extent does entropy in the international system weaken the de facto authority of international law, with implications for adjudicating legal claims or enforcing the laws of armed conflict in the conflicts in Middle East? This panel will examine the legal pressures on effective security cooperation and their likely consequences for countries with weaker legal systems and restive, potentially mobile populations.

Chair: Ben Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, Research Director in Public Law, Co-Director of the Harvard Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security and Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare

Panelists:

Anders Henricksen: Associate Professor of Public International Law and Director of the Center for International Law and Justice at the University of Copenhagen School of Law

Devika Hovell: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics (TBC)
Chris Inglis: Visiting Professor of Cyber Studies at the United States Naval Academy and Venture Partner at Paladin Capital; former Deputy Director and Senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency (TBC)
Louise Richardson: Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford (TBC)

Christian Tams: Professor of International Law at the Unive

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

For a complex of reasons, including antipathy to religious and ethnic nationalism, an increasingly polarized political climate (and possibly latent antisemitism), most academics are reflexively hostile to Israel. This hostility to Israel informs the attitudes of students who will lead the next generation and contributes to a climate on campus of support for BDS: The movement to boycott Israeli academics and to divest university endowments from Israel. As they pass through the revolving door between academia and policy, university professors influence this government and governments abroad in ways invidious to the long term security of Israel.

AE alumni occupy positions of influence in academia and in the world of policy intellectuals internationally. Follow up programming is essential to capitalize upon and to deepen the impact of the Israel missions, and to foster a the cohesive sense of community which will enable alumni not only to resist but to counter the generally hostile attitudes toward Israel on campus.

The benefits we anticipate from this effort are several-fold and include:

a. The direct influence of participants on their students through the lifetime of their teaching career.

b. The heightened sympathy for Israel that participants will evince in their various roles of policy advisory and policy formation.

c. Participants' contribution to fostering an cohesive, influential and sympathetic community of support for Israel in the general academic and policy intellectual world.

d. Heightened sympathy for Israel among students of our participants, with lasting impact throughout the lifetime of their participation in the democratic process.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Since its establishment, AE has brought to Israel 459 leading academics, established working partnerships with academic institutions of the first rank, and currently operates 6 annual missions to Israel as well as extensive adjunct and follow-on activities.

AE's alumni play an enthusiastic role in all aspects of AE's operations. They nominate, select and invite mission participants, conceive and organize follow up programming, and strategize the most effective ways to achieve AE's mission. Their time, creativity and credibility has been the crucial factor in AE's success to date.

Participants in AE missions and follow up programs over the past 12 months include Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, three former General Counsels of the National Security Agency (NSA), a former General Counsel of the CIA, the former Director of the National Counter-Terrorism Center, the former US Ambassador to Afghanistan, the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, the Dean of Princeton, the former Dean of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, a two time Pulitzer Prize winning historian from Stanford, and former and current department chairs from UCLA, the Marine War College, the London School of Economics, Harvard, MIT, Yale, Stanford and Beijing University.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

Pre and post-mission surveys conducted for AE by the former Director of Evaluation for Taglit-Birthright, Harvard Kennedy School research scientist, Yigal Rosen, consistently reveal participants' new and humbled appreciation for Israel's complex strategic challenges and their respect for the care and high moral seriousness with which Israel grapples with the challenge of achieving security for its citizens while protecting the human and civil rights of its minority Arab population. This attitude of humility and respect makes our alumni a thoughtful, informed and effective counterweight to the atmosphere of demonization of Israel current on campus. AE is continuing to refine these surveys and to incorporate their findings into the mission itinerary for optimal impact.

The impression of a deep and sympathetic impression on mission participants is evidenced in written feedback, and reinforced by the eager willingness of alumni to participate in AE follow up programming and to lend their time, insight and credibility to planning, organizing and promoting AE programming among their colleagues.

Detailed survey data of the ways the Israel experience informs participants' teaching post-mission is available upon request.

The influence of the AE alumni network is documented in an comprehensive data base summarizing the indices of their power including policy and advisory positions, editorships, tenured and endowed professorships, department chairmanships, and media presence. This data base is also available upon request.

Back to Top

Retreat for AE European Alumni

About


In October 2018, Academic Exchange will mount a retreat in England for English and European alumni of the AE Israel missions. Responsibility for the planning of this retreat has been assumed by 4 AE alumni: Peter Trubowitz (Chair of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics), Lesley Vinjamuri (Chair of the Center for Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS, University of London), James Davis (Director of the Department of Political Science at St. Gallen) and Gunther Hellman (Professor of International Relations at Goethe University).

The retreat is already fully subscribed and the following people have confirmed their attendance:

Mathias Albert: Professor of Political Science at Bielefeld University in Germany

Pierre Allan: Professor of Political Science at the University of Geneva

Richard Caplan: Professor of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University

Lars-Erik Cederman: Professor of International Conflict Research at ETH Zurich

Mitat Celikpala: Professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University in Turkey

James W. Davis: Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Institute of Political Science at St. Gallen

Dirk De Bièvre: Associate Professor of International Politics at the University of Antwerp

Sujit Dutta: M K Gandhi Chair Nelson Mandela Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Jamia Millia Islamia

Anthony Dworkin: Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations

Filip Ejdus: Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Global Insecurities Centre, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS), University of Bristol

Richard English: Professor of Politics at Queen's University Belfast, and Distinguished Professorial Fellow in the George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice in Northern Ireland

Adam Fagan: Professor of European Politics and head of School, Queen Mary University of London

Mervyn Frost: Professor of International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

Robin Geiss: Professor of International Law and Security at the University of Glasgow

Joshua Geltzer: Executive Director and Visiting Professor of Law at the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, Georgetown University Law Center

Tom Grant: Professor of Law at the University of Cambridge, England

Carola Groppe: Professor of Educational Science at the Helmut Schmidt University in Germany

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sally Krause Distinguished Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, Director of the Korea-Pacific Program (KPP) in the Graduate School of International Relations at Pacific Studies at UCSD

Gunther Hellmann: Professor of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

Anders Henriksen: Associate Professor of Public International Law and Director of the Center for International Law and Justice at the University of Copenhagen School of Law

Simon Hix: Professor of European and Comparative Politics and Former Head of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics

Stephanie Hofmann: Associate Professor in Political Science at the Graduate Institute Geneva in Switzerland

Devika Hovell: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics

Chris Inglis: Visiting Professor of Cyber Studies at the United States Naval Academy and Venture Partner at Paladin Capital; former Deputy Director and Senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency

Desmond King: Andrew W Mellon Professor of American Government at the University of Oxford

Ivan Krastev: Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Bulgaria

Charles Kupchan: Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; former Special Assistant to the President for National Security

Walter Mattli: Fellow in Politics at St. John's College and Professor of International Political Economy in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University

Hartmut Mayer: Fellow and Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at St. Peter`s College, University of Oxford and Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe in Bologna

Peter Mayer: Professor of International Relations at the Institute for Intercultural and International Studies at the University of Bremen

Alex Mills: Professor of Public and Private International Law at the University College London

James Morrison: Assistant Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics

Kalypso Nicolaidis: Professor of International Relations and Director of the European Studies Centre at Oxford

Andra Laszlo Pap: Associate Professor at Eötvös University (ELTE) Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media and Communication; Research Chair at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Legal Studies in Budapest; Project manager of the Hungarian Focal Point of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights; staff editor of International and European Public Law Review

Barry Posen: Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program

Marissa Quie: Lecturer and Researcher in Political Science at the University of Cambridge

Gina Reinhardt: Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Government at the University of Essex

Louise Richardson: Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of St. Andrews

Stephanie Rickard: Associate Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics

Simon Saunders: Professor of Philosophy of Physics at the University of Oxford

Duncan Snidal: Professor of International Relations, Director of Research Training and Fellow of Nuffield College at Oxford

Stephan Stetter: Professor of Global Politics and Conflict Studies at Universitat der Bundeswehr

Chrisitian Tams: Professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow

Kimberley Trapp: Professor of Public International Law at the University College London

Antonios Tzanakopoulos: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the University of Oxford

Kivanc Ulusoy: Associate Professor of Political Science at Istanbul University

Guglielmo Verdirame: Professor of International Law at King’s College London

Leslie Vinjamuri: Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London

Nicholas Wheeler: Professor of International Relations and Director of the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security at the University of Birmingham

Jürgen Wilzewski: Professor of International Relations and Political Science at the University of Kaiserlautern

Ben Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, Research Director in Public Law, Co-Director of the Harvard Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security and Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare

Reinhard Wolf: Professor of International Relations and chair in International Relations and World Order Issues in the Department of Political Science at Goethe University in Frankfurt

Ayşe Zarakol: University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Cambridge

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

AE's 8 day missions to Israel have demonstrated significant
impact on the attitudes of participants, but follow up programming is essential if this impact is to be sustained and deepened over time. Further and crucially, follow up programming establishes a sense of community among mission alumni, sustaining their altered point of view in support of Israel and establishing them as a cohesive and effective counterweight in a larger and generally hostile academic community,

In 2017 AE mounted the following adjunct programs for mission alumni:

9/1/16: Alumni reunion at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association (coordinated by AE alumnus, Steve Krasner)
9/21/16: Presentation for Los Angeles based alumni by Professor Eugene Volokh
11/17/16: Gathering for New York based alumni with Dani Dayan, Israel Consul General (coordinated by AE alumnus, Matt Waxman)
11/20/16: Presentation for DC based alumni with Professor Asher Susser, former Director of the Dayan Center for Middle-East Studies at Tel Aviv University (coordinated by AE alumnus, Ben Wittes)
2/16/17: Conference at Stanford University on Federalism in the Middle-East (coordinated by AE alumni Mila Versteeg and Ben Wittes)
2/2717: Presentation for Washington DC based alumni with Israeli journalist, Aluf Benn (coordinated by AE alumnus Ben Wittes)
5/15/17 Conference for Chinese Alumni in Partnership with the Harvard China Fund in Shanghai (coordinated by AE alumni Bill Kirby, Chair of the Harvard China Fund, former Dean of Arts and Sciences at Harvard, and Wang Jisi, Chair of the Department of International Relations at Beijing University)
June 4-6, 2017 -- Alumni Retreat in Ojai, California (coordinated by Keren Yarhi-Milo (Princeton), Kenneth Schultz (Stanford) and Jon Pevehouse (Wisconsin). 120 AE alumni attended the retreat at their own expense.

Of these programs, the most effective and cost-efficient was the retreat for mission alumni. 120 former mission participants attended at their own expense.

In 2018 AE plans to mount a retreat in England for AE's English and European mission alumni. Going forward, AE intends to establish the retreat as an annual event, alternating between Europe and the United States.


Back to Top

Program Description

AE European Alumni Retreat

October 14-16 2018

Wilton Park, UK

Proposed Panels, Abstracts, and Participants

  • The Western Liberal (Dis)Order and the Middle East
  • Authoritarianism and Geopolitics in the Levante
  • The Iranian Nuclear Deal Three Years On
  • Identity, Migration, and Diaspora
  • Bottom-Up Approaches to Conflict Mitigation

Patterns of conflict and cooperation in the Middle East have always been critically affected by overarching systemic processes such as the “superpower rivalry” during the Cold War or multilateral, mostly Western initiatives aimed at building bridges between conflicting parties in the region. Today, mounting internal problems in Europe and America and worsening EU-US relations in the Trump era pose new challenges for a region in flux. How will the West’s preoccupation with internal matters impact Western resolve and strategic ties and relations within the Middle East and Persian Gulf? Should we expect Russian and China to play a more active and central role in the region’s politics and if so, with what consequences? Will regional powers such as Iran be freer to exercise power and influence in the region? This panel will examine these and other questions concerning the future of the Middle East at a time of Western disorder.

Chair: Peter Trubowitz: Professor of International Relations and Head of International Relations Department at the London School of Economics and Director of the LSE’s US Centre

Panelists:

Charles Kupchan: Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; former Special Assistant to the President for National Security

Barry Posen: Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program

Ngaire Woods: Founding Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government and Professor of Global Economic Governance at Oxford University (TBC)

From Israel’s strategic point of view its neighborhood is shaped by more or less authoritarian powers and fairly fluid coalitions – perhaps more so than ever before. Authoritarianism is more clearly visible in Turkey and Egypt, two relatively reliable partners in the old days. What does the rise of authoritarianism mean for the dynamics of war and peace (and coalition building) in the region? How do patterns of intrastate and interstate violence affect domestic stability in key regional states? How is Israel positioning itself vis-à-vis these external dynamics – and to what extent can it influence these events? How do these developments affect the relationship between Europe (and the EU in particular) and Israel?

Chair: Gunther Hellmann: Professor of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

Panelists:Lisa Anderson: James T. Shotwell Professor Emerita of International Relations at Columbia University (TBC)

Nadav Eyal: Chief International Correspondent – Israel Channel 10

Soli Ozel: Professor of International Relations at Istanbul's Kadir Has University

Ayse Zarakol: University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Cambridge

In July 2015, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) between Iran, the P5+1, and the EU was announced. Have the signatories to the JCPOA lived up to their international obligations and commitments?How far apart are America and Europe in their respective judgments about whether Iran is fulfilling its obligations under the JCOPA? Have Israel’s and the Gulf States’ fears that the nuclear deal would shift the balance of power in the region toward Iran materialized? What are the prospects of the nuclear deal going forward? This panel will look back on the JCPOA, the subsequent challenges to it in the region and beyond, and the road ahead.

Chair: Leslie Vinjamuri: Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London

Panelists:

Ellie Geranmayeh: Senior Policy Fellow for the Middle East and North Africa Programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations (TBC)

Steve Erlanger: London Bureau Chief for the New York Times

Steve Krasner:Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations; Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, andDeputy Director of the Freeman Spogli Institute (TBC)

Gen (ret.) Eli Ben Meir: Former Chief Intelligence Officer of the IDF

Wendy Sherman: Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and Senior Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (TBC)

Europe’s “migration crisis” has re-ignited identity politics and created a backlash across Europe.Has the migration crisis created new impetus for European leaders to back new initiatives aimed at stabilizing the Middle East?Will this backlash accelerate patterns of Jewish out-immigration from Europe to Israel and in turn, dampen the rise in Israeli migration to Germany, France and other European destinations in recent decades? How has Europe’s preoccupation with countering terror shaped political responses to migration across the continent? This panel will explore the political dynamics of migration between Europe and the Middle East and consider their implications for Israel and the Jewish diaspora.

Chair:James Davis: Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Institute of Political Science at St. Gallen (TBC)

Panelists:Dani Kranz: Stern Centre for Jewish Studies Berlin-Brandenberg

Kalypso Nicolaidis: Professor of International Relations and Director of the European Studies Centre at Oxford

Uzi Rebhun: Demographer in the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry at Hebrew University

As the prospects for an Oslo-style grand bargain recede, attention has again focused on the role that economic approaches might play in conflict resolution. The range of possible nodes around which cooperation could form are numerous, from water and power agreements, public and private investments in the West Bank and Gaza, a deepening of cross-border flows of capital, goods, services and people, and projects designed to effectively strengthen the Palestinian state in order to mitigate economic grievances. As a long liberal tradition in international relations suggests, growing economic interdependence may not only create vested interests in peace but build altogether new constituencies for it. This panel considers the prospects and limits of such approaches.

Chair: Steph Haggard: Lawrence and Sally Krause Distinguished Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, Director of the Korea-Pacific Program (KPP) in the Graduate School of International Relations at Pacific Studies at UCSD

Panelists: Lars-Erik Cederman: Professor of International Conflict Research at ETH Zurich (TBC)

Uri Shamir: Professor Emeritus of Environmental, Water and Agricultural Engineering at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House (TBC)

Lina Khatib: Head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House (TBC)

Anthony Dworkin: Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations (TBC)

Ron Schatzberg: Reserve Colonel in the IDF and Senior Advisor at the Economic Cooperation Foundation

6) Stresses on the International Law System and their Security Implications

Over the past few years, the European Union has seen one of its most powerful members head for the exits and financial crisis among its other members. Europe has also seen a giant influx of refugees from the Middle East and elsewhere, with which its member states have struggled to cope. Major terrorist operations have stressed international law enforcement cooperation. Russia has seized territory by force from Ukrain. And the United States has elected Donald Trump, who has withdrawn from the Paris Climate Agreement and brought into doubt key expectations of U.S. allies and partners. How is the international law system coping with these serial pressures and to what extent will they effect developments in the Middle East? How are they affecting security cooperation between countries whose security is necessarily intertwined? To what extent is the fragmentation of the EU limiting the ability and the leverage of its member states to mount coherent foreign policy, either separately or jointly. More generally, to what extent does entropy in the international system weaken the de facto authority of international law, with implications for adjudicating legal claims or enforcing the laws of armed conflict in the conflicts in Middle East? This panel will examine the legal pressures on effective security cooperation and their likely consequences for countries with weaker legal systems and restive, potentially mobile populations.

Chair: Ben Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, Research Director in Public Law, Co-Director of the Harvard Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security and Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare

Panelists:

Anders Henricksen: Associate Professor of Public International Law and Director of the Center for International Law and Justice at the University of Copenhagen School of Law

Devika Hovell: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics (TBC)
Chris Inglis: Visiting Professor of Cyber Studies at the United States Naval Academy and Venture Partner at Paladin Capital; former Deputy Director and Senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency (TBC)
Louise Richardson: Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford (TBC)

Christian Tams: Professor of International Law at the Unive

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

For a complex of reasons, including antipathy to religious and ethnic nationalism, an increasingly polarized political climate (and possibly latent antisemitism), most academics are reflexively hostile to Israel. This hostility to Israel informs the attitudes of students who will lead the next generation and contributes to a climate on campus of support for BDS: The movement to boycott Israeli academics and to divest university endowments from Israel. As they pass through the revolving door between academia and policy, university professors influence this government and governments abroad in ways invidious to the long term security of Israel.

AE alumni occupy positions of influence in academia and in the world of policy intellectuals internationally. Follow up programming is essential to capitalize upon and to deepen the impact of the Israel missions, and to foster a the cohesive sense of community which will enable alumni not only to resist but to counter the generally hostile attitudes toward Israel on campus.

The benefits we anticipate from this effort are several-fold and include:

a. The direct influence of participants on their students through the lifetime of their teaching career.

b. The heightened sympathy for Israel that participants will evince in their various roles of policy advisory and policy formation.

c. Participants' contribution to fostering an cohesive, influential and sympathetic community of support for Israel in the general academic and policy intellectual world.

d. Heightened sympathy for Israel among students of our participants, with lasting impact throughout the lifetime of their participation in the democratic process.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Since its establishment, AE has brought to Israel 459 leading academics, established working partnerships with academic institutions of the first rank, and currently operates 6 annual missions to Israel as well as extensive adjunct and follow-on activities.

AE's alumni play an enthusiastic role in all aspects of AE's operations. They nominate, select and invite mission participants, conceive and organize follow up programming, and strategize the most effective ways to achieve AE's mission. Their time, creativity and credibility has been the crucial factor in AE's success to date.

Participants in AE missions and follow up programs over the past 12 months include Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, three former General Counsels of the National Security Agency (NSA), a former General Counsel of the CIA, the former Director of the National Counter-Terrorism Center, the former US Ambassador to Afghanistan, the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, the Dean of Princeton, the former Dean of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, a two time Pulitzer Prize winning historian from Stanford, and former and current department chairs from UCLA, the Marine War College, the London School of Economics, Harvard, MIT, Yale, Stanford and Beijing University.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

Pre and post-mission surveys conducted for AE by the former Director of Evaluation for Taglit-Birthright, Harvard Kennedy School research scientist, Yigal Rosen, consistently reveal participants' new and humbled appreciation for Israel's complex strategic challenges and their respect for the care and high moral seriousness with which Israel grapples with the challenge of achieving security for its citizens while protecting the human and civil rights of its minority Arab population. This attitude of humility and respect makes our alumni a thoughtful, informed and effective counterweight to the atmosphere of demonization of Israel current on campus. AE is continuing to refine these surveys and to incorporate their findings into the mission itinerary for optimal impact.

The impression of a deep and sympathetic impression on mission participants is evidenced in written feedback, and reinforced by the eager willingness of alumni to participate in AE follow up programming and to lend their time, insight and credibility to planning, organizing and promoting AE programming among their colleagues.

Detailed survey data of the ways the Israel experience informs participants' teaching post-mission is available upon request.

The influence of the AE alumni network is documented in an comprehensive data base summarizing the indices of their power including policy and advisory positions, editorships, tenured and endowed professorships, department chairmanships, and media presence. This data base is also available upon request.

Back to Top

Retreat for AE European Alumni

About


In October 2018, Academic Exchange will mount a retreat in England for English and European alumni of the AE Israel missions. Responsibility for the planning of this retreat has been assumed by 4 AE alumni: Peter Trubowitz (Chair of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics), Lesley Vinjamuri (Chair of the Center for Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS, University of London), James Davis (Director of the Department of Political Science at St. Gallen) and Gunther Hellman (Professor of International Relations at Goethe University).

The retreat is already fully subscribed and the following people have confirmed their attendance:

Mathias Albert: Professor of Political Science at Bielefeld University in Germany

Pierre Allan: Professor of Political Science at the University of Geneva

Richard Caplan: Professor of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University

Lars-Erik Cederman: Professor of International Conflict Research at ETH Zurich

Mitat Celikpala: Professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University in Turkey

James W. Davis: Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Institute of Political Science at St. Gallen

Dirk De Bièvre: Associate Professor of International Politics at the University of Antwerp

Sujit Dutta: M K Gandhi Chair Nelson Mandela Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Jamia Millia Islamia

Anthony Dworkin: Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations

Filip Ejdus: Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Global Insecurities Centre, School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS), University of Bristol

Richard English: Professor of Politics at Queen's University Belfast, and Distinguished Professorial Fellow in the George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice in Northern Ireland

Adam Fagan: Professor of European Politics and head of School, Queen Mary University of London

Mervyn Frost: Professor of International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

Robin Geiss: Professor of International Law and Security at the University of Glasgow

Joshua Geltzer: Executive Director and Visiting Professor of Law at the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, Georgetown University Law Center

Tom Grant: Professor of Law at the University of Cambridge, England

Carola Groppe: Professor of Educational Science at the Helmut Schmidt University in Germany

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sally Krause Distinguished Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, Director of the Korea-Pacific Program (KPP) in the Graduate School of International Relations at Pacific Studies at UCSD

Gunther Hellmann: Professor of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

Anders Henriksen: Associate Professor of Public International Law and Director of the Center for International Law and Justice at the University of Copenhagen School of Law

Simon Hix: Professor of European and Comparative Politics and Former Head of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics

Stephanie Hofmann: Associate Professor in Political Science at the Graduate Institute Geneva in Switzerland

Devika Hovell: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics

Chris Inglis: Visiting Professor of Cyber Studies at the United States Naval Academy and Venture Partner at Paladin Capital; former Deputy Director and Senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency

Desmond King: Andrew W Mellon Professor of American Government at the University of Oxford

Ivan Krastev: Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Bulgaria

Charles Kupchan: Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; former Special Assistant to the President for National Security

Walter Mattli: Fellow in Politics at St. John's College and Professor of International Political Economy in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University

Hartmut Mayer: Fellow and Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at St. Peter`s College, University of Oxford and Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe in Bologna

Peter Mayer: Professor of International Relations at the Institute for Intercultural and International Studies at the University of Bremen

Alex Mills: Professor of Public and Private International Law at the University College London

James Morrison: Assistant Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics

Kalypso Nicolaidis: Professor of International Relations and Director of the European Studies Centre at Oxford

Andra Laszlo Pap: Associate Professor at Eötvös University (ELTE) Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media and Communication; Research Chair at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Legal Studies in Budapest; Project manager of the Hungarian Focal Point of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights; staff editor of International and European Public Law Review

Barry Posen: Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program

Marissa Quie: Lecturer and Researcher in Political Science at the University of Cambridge

Gina Reinhardt: Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Government at the University of Essex

Louise Richardson: Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of St. Andrews

Stephanie Rickard: Associate Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics

Simon Saunders: Professor of Philosophy of Physics at the University of Oxford

Duncan Snidal: Professor of International Relations, Director of Research Training and Fellow of Nuffield College at Oxford

Stephan Stetter: Professor of Global Politics and Conflict Studies at Universitat der Bundeswehr

Chrisitian Tams: Professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow

Kimberley Trapp: Professor of Public International Law at the University College London

Antonios Tzanakopoulos: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the University of Oxford

Kivanc Ulusoy: Associate Professor of Political Science at Istanbul University

Guglielmo Verdirame: Professor of International Law at King’s College London

Leslie Vinjamuri: Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London

Nicholas Wheeler: Professor of International Relations and Director of the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security at the University of Birmingham

Jürgen Wilzewski: Professor of International Relations and Political Science at the University of Kaiserlautern

Ben Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, Research Director in Public Law, Co-Director of the Harvard Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security and Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare

Reinhard Wolf: Professor of International Relations and chair in International Relations and World Order Issues in the Department of Political Science at Goethe University in Frankfurt

Ayşe Zarakol: University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Cambridge

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

AE's 8 day missions to Israel have demonstrated significant
impact on the attitudes of participants, but follow up programming is essential if this impact is to be sustained and deepened over time. Further and crucially, follow up programming establishes a sense of community among mission alumni, sustaining their altered point of view in support of Israel and establishing them as a cohesive and effective counterweight in a larger and generally hostile academic community,

In 2017 AE mounted the following adjunct programs for mission alumni:

9/1/16: Alumni reunion at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association (coordinated by AE alumnus, Steve Krasner)
9/21/16: Presentation for Los Angeles based alumni by Professor Eugene Volokh
11/17/16: Gathering for New York based alumni with Dani Dayan, Israel Consul General (coordinated by AE alumnus, Matt Waxman)
11/20/16: Presentation for DC based alumni with Professor Asher Susser, former Director of the Dayan Center for Middle-East Studies at Tel Aviv University (coordinated by AE alumnus, Ben Wittes)
2/16/17: Conference at Stanford University on Federalism in the Middle-East (coordinated by AE alumni Mila Versteeg and Ben Wittes)
2/2717: Presentation for Washington DC based alumni with Israeli journalist, Aluf Benn (coordinated by AE alumnus Ben Wittes)
5/15/17 Conference for Chinese Alumni in Partnership with the Harvard China Fund in Shanghai (coordinated by AE alumni Bill Kirby, Chair of the Harvard China Fund, former Dean of Arts and Sciences at Harvard, and Wang Jisi, Chair of the Department of International Relations at Beijing University)
June 4-6, 2017 -- Alumni Retreat in Ojai, California (coordinated by Keren Yarhi-Milo (Princeton), Kenneth Schultz (Stanford) and Jon Pevehouse (Wisconsin). 120 AE alumni attended the retreat at their own expense.

Of these programs, the most effective and cost-efficient was the retreat for mission alumni. 120 former mission participants attended at their own expense.

In 2018 AE plans to mount a retreat in England for AE's English and European mission alumni. Going forward, AE intends to establish the retreat as an annual event, alternating between Europe and the United States.



Back to Top

Program Description

AE European Alumni Retreat

October 14-16 2018

Wilton Park, UK

Proposed Panels, Abstracts, and Participants

  • The Western Liberal (Dis)Order and the Middle East
  • Authoritarianism and Geopolitics in the Levante
  • The Iranian Nuclear Deal Three Years On
  • Identity, Migration, and Diaspora
  • Bottom-Up Approaches to Conflict Mitigation

Patterns of conflict and cooperation in the Middle East have always been critically affected by overarching systemic processes such as the “superpower rivalry” during the Cold War or multilateral, mostly Western initiatives aimed at building bridges between conflicting parties in the region. Today, mounting internal problems in Europe and America and worsening EU-US relations in the Trump era pose new challenges for a region in flux. How will the West’s preoccupation with internal matters impact Western resolve and strategic ties and relations within the Middle East and Persian Gulf? Should we expect Russian and China to play a more active and central role in the region’s politics and if so, with what consequences? Will regional powers such as Iran be freer to exercise power and influence in the region? This panel will examine these and other questions concerning the future of the Middle East at a time of Western disorder.

Chair: Peter Trubowitz: Professor of International Relations and Head of International Relations Department at the London School of Economics and Director of the LSE’s US Centre

Panelists:

Charles Kupchan: Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; former Special Assistant to the President for National Security

Barry Posen: Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program

Ngaire Woods: Founding Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government and Professor of Global Economic Governance at Oxford University (TBC)

From Israel’s strategic point of view its neighborhood is shaped by more or less authoritarian powers and fairly fluid coalitions – perhaps more so than ever before. Authoritarianism is more clearly visible in Turkey and Egypt, two relatively reliable partners in the old days. What does the rise of authoritarianism mean for the dynamics of war and peace (and coalition building) in the region? How do patterns of intrastate and interstate violence affect domestic stability in key regional states? How is Israel positioning itself vis-à-vis these external dynamics – and to what extent can it influence these events? How do these developments affect the relationship between Europe (and the EU in particular) and Israel?

Chair: Gunther Hellmann: Professor of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main

Panelists:Lisa Anderson: James T. Shotwell Professor Emerita of International Relations at Columbia University (TBC)

Nadav Eyal: Chief International Correspondent – Israel Channel 10

Soli Ozel: Professor of International Relations at Istanbul's Kadir Has University

Ayse Zarakol: University Lecturer in International Relations, University of Cambridge

In July 2015, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) between Iran, the P5+1, and the EU was announced. Have the signatories to the JCPOA lived up to their international obligations and commitments?How far apart are America and Europe in their respective judgments about whether Iran is fulfilling its obligations under the JCOPA? Have Israel’s and the Gulf States’ fears that the nuclear deal would shift the balance of power in the region toward Iran materialized? What are the prospects of the nuclear deal going forward? This panel will look back on the JCPOA, the subsequent challenges to it in the region and beyond, and the road ahead.

Chair: Leslie Vinjamuri: Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London

Panelists:

Ellie Geranmayeh: Senior Policy Fellow for the Middle East and North Africa Programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations (TBC)

Steve Erlanger: London Bureau Chief for the New York Times

Steve Krasner:Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations; Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, andDeputy Director of the Freeman Spogli Institute (TBC)

Gen (ret.) Eli Ben Meir: Former Chief Intelligence Officer of the IDF

Wendy Sherman: Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and Senior Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (TBC)

Europe’s “migration crisis” has re-ignited identity politics and created a backlash across Europe.Has the migration crisis created new impetus for European leaders to back new initiatives aimed at stabilizing the Middle East?Will this backlash accelerate patterns of Jewish out-immigration from Europe to Israel and in turn, dampen the rise in Israeli migration to Germany, France and other European destinations in recent decades? How has Europe’s preoccupation with countering terror shaped political responses to migration across the continent? This panel will explore the political dynamics of migration between Europe and the Middle East and consider their implications for Israel and the Jewish diaspora.

Chair:James Davis: Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Institute of Political Science at St. Gallen (TBC)

Panelists:Dani Kranz: Stern Centre for Jewish Studies Berlin-Brandenberg

Kalypso Nicolaidis: Professor of International Relations and Director of the European Studies Centre at Oxford

Uzi Rebhun: Demographer in the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry at Hebrew University

As the prospects for an Oslo-style grand bargain recede, attention has again focused on the role that economic approaches might play in conflict resolution. The range of possible nodes around which cooperation could form are numerous, from water and power agreements, public and private investments in the West Bank and Gaza, a deepening of cross-border flows of capital, goods, services and people, and projects designed to effectively strengthen the Palestinian state in order to mitigate economic grievances. As a long liberal tradition in international relations suggests, growing economic interdependence may not only create vested interests in peace but build altogether new constituencies for it. This panel considers the prospects and limits of such approaches.

Chair: Steph Haggard: Lawrence and Sally Krause Distinguished Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, Director of the Korea-Pacific Program (KPP) in the Graduate School of International Relations at Pacific Studies at UCSD

Panelists: Lars-Erik Cederman: Professor of International Conflict Research at ETH Zurich (TBC)

Uri Shamir: Professor Emeritus of Environmental, Water and Agricultural Engineering at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House (TBC)

Lina Khatib: Head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House (TBC)

Anthony Dworkin: Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations (TBC)

Ron Schatzberg: Reserve Colonel in the IDF and Senior Advisor at the Economic Cooperation Foundation

6) Stresses on the International Law System and their Security Implications

Over the past few years, the European Union has seen one of its most powerful members head for the exits and financial crisis among its other members. Europe has also seen a giant influx of refugees from the Middle East and elsewhere, with which its member states have struggled to cope. Major terrorist operations have stressed international law enforcement cooperation. Russia has seized territory by force from Ukrain. And the United States has elected Donald Trump, who has withdrawn from the Paris Climate Agreement and brought into doubt key expectations of U.S. allies and partners. How is the international law system coping with these serial pressures and to what extent will they effect developments in the Middle East? How are they affecting security cooperation between countries whose security is necessarily intertwined? To what extent is the fragmentation of the EU limiting the ability and the leverage of its member states to mount coherent foreign policy, either separately or jointly. More generally, to what extent does entropy in the international system weaken the de facto authority of international law, with implications for adjudicating legal claims or enforcing the laws of armed conflict in the conflicts in Middle East? This panel will examine the legal pressures on effective security cooperation and their likely consequences for countries with weaker legal systems and restive, potentially mobile populations.

Chair: Ben Wittes: Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute, Research Director in Public Law, Co-Director of the Harvard Law School – Brookings Project on Law and Security and Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare

Panelists:

Anders Henricksen: Associate Professor of Public International Law and Director of the Center for International Law and Justice at the University of Copenhagen School of Law

Devika Hovell: Associate Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics (TBC)
Chris Inglis: Visiting Professor of Cyber Studies at the United States Naval Academy and Venture Partner at Paladin Capital; former Deputy Director and Senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency (TBC)
Louise Richardson: Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford (TBC)

Christian Tams: Professor of International Law at the Unive

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

For a complex of reasons, including antipathy to religious and ethnic nationalism, an increasingly polarized political climate (and possibly latent antisemitism), most academics are reflexively hostile to Israel. This hostility to Israel informs the attitudes of students who will lead the next generation and contributes to a climate on campus of support for BDS: The movement to boycott Israeli academics and to divest university endowments from Israel. As they pass through the revolving door between academia and policy, university professors influence this government and governments abroad in ways invidious to the long term security of Israel.

AE alumni occupy positions of influence in academia and in the world of policy intellectuals internationally. Follow up programming is essential to capitalize upon and to deepen the impact of the Israel missions, and to foster a the cohesive sense of community which will enable alumni not only to resist but to counter the generally hostile attitudes toward Israel on campus.

The benefits we anticipate from this effort are several-fold and include:

a. The direct influence of participants on their students through the lifetime of their teaching career.

b. The heightened sympathy for Israel that participants will evince in their various roles of policy advisory and policy formation.

c. Participants' contribution to fostering an cohesive, influential and sympathetic community of support for Israel in the general academic and policy intellectual world.

d. Heightened sympathy for Israel among students of our participants, with lasting impact throughout the lifetime of their participation in the democratic process.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Since its establishment, AE has brought to Israel 459 leading academics, established working partnerships with academic institutions of the first rank, and currently operates 6 annual missions to Israel as well as extensive adjunct and follow-on activities.

AE's alumni play an enthusiastic role in all aspects of AE's operations. They nominate, select and invite mission participants, conceive and organize follow up programming, and strategize the most effective ways to achieve AE's mission. Their time, creativity and credibility has been the crucial factor in AE's success to date.

Participants in AE missions and follow up programs over the past 12 months include Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, three former General Counsels of the National Security Agency (NSA), a former General Counsel of the CIA, the former Director of the National Counter-Terrorism Center, the former US Ambassador to Afghanistan, the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, the Dean of Princeton, the former Dean of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, a two time Pulitzer Prize winning historian from Stanford, and former and current department chairs from UCLA, the Marine War College, the London School of Economics, Harvard, MIT, Yale, Stanford and Beijing University.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

Pre and post-mission surveys conducted for AE by the former Director of Evaluation for Taglit-Birthright, Harvard Kennedy School research scientist, Yigal Rosen, consistently reveal participants' new and humbled appreciation for Israel's complex strategic challenges and their respect for the care and high moral seriousness with which Israel grapples with the challenge of achieving security for its citizens while protecting the human and civil rights of its minority Arab population. This attitude of humility and respect makes our alumni a thoughtful, informed and effective counterweight to the atmosphere of demonization of Israel current on campus. AE is continuing to refine these surveys and to incorporate their findings into the mission itinerary for optimal impact.

The impression of a deep and sympathetic impression on mission participants is evidenced in written feedback, and reinforced by the eager willingness of alumni to participate in AE follow up programming and to lend their time, insight and credibility to planning, organizing and promoting AE programming among their colleagues.

Detailed survey data of the ways the Israel experience informs participants' teaching post-mission is available upon request.

The influence of the AE alumni network is documented in an comprehensive data base summarizing the indices of their power including policy and advisory positions, editorships, tenured and endowed professorships, department chairmanships, and media presence. This data base is also available upon request.

Back to Top

×

Are you ready to take your giving circle from idea to reality?

Our Jewish Giving Circle Incubator will help you bring your giving circle to life. Whether you're 23 or 73, interested in social justice or Jewish innovation, and ready to give $50 or $10,000, we want you to join the Incubator. Apply today!

Applications are open until July 31st.

Apply Now
×