Muslim Jewish Conference

The Muslims Jewish Conference is a global, grassroots nonprofit organization that fosters dialogue, relationships and joint initiatives between Muslims and Jews worldwide. The Conference aims to address the idea of otherness in the hopes of effectively dispelling this damaging construct.

Location: Vienna, Austria

Description

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Connecting Actions

About

Connecting Actions is an international symposium for citizen, intercultural, and interfaith dialogue groups to share best practices.

The symposium, hosted by The Muslim Jewish Conference (MJC) in collaboration with Coexister, Three Faith Forum, Faith Matters, and the European Union of Jewish Students, serves to bring citizen, intercultural, and interreligious dialogue groups from around Europe to share their experience in the field: best practices, major mistakes made, and best lessons learned.

The first ever Connecting Actions conference took place in Paris in November 2016 in the backdrop of mounting religious tensions in Europe. The symposium followed a format whereby for the first two days, pressing questions around the concept of active coexistence, methods and objectives of dialogue, challenges, combating radicalism, resources, social message and media coverage were brought forth for intense rounds of discussions. The discussions were facilitated with tested techniques and methodologies. This meeting concluded with an evaluation and a written document, which was communicated to the public via joint press conference on the last day of the conference, November 25.

Since the conference, Connecting Actions has hosted two localized events-- one run by the MJC and the European Union of Jewish Students in Berlin on Muslim Jewish Dialogue, and the other on tolerance training in Vienna. The activist network and symposium received its name based on a global network that one of the organizing organizations, the Muslim Jewish Conference, created on Facebook in response to the refugee crisis, which began last summer. Called Connecting Actions, the group mobilized a few hundred young Muslims and Jews around Europe to help assist the refugees by providing food and clothing for them upon their arrival in Germany, Austria, and Hungary.

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What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The mission and purpse of Connecting Actions is to connect interfaith and intercultural dialogue activists to share best practices on a gloabl scale, something which has never been done before.

Back to Top

Program Description

The program is, essentially, a network. We hosted our first annual conference on Connecting Actions in Paris in November, which brought together 33 organizations to discuss our best practices and what we've all learned in our interfaith and intercultural dialogue work. Many of us have made the same mistakes, and we're creating this network so that we don't all have to learn the lessons over and over again. We are crafting a compendium of knowledge for everyone doing this work globally. We, along with our steering committee and currently network of 33 organizations around the US, Europe, and Asia, are combating hate on local levels, and are simultaneously developing a global network to do so as well.

We are currently in the process of having one of the MJC programming volunteers create a tailored platform through which we can all collaborate and be in touch. We are looking to partner with Asana, a digital task organizer and calendar or Slack. This is still in its preliminary stages, but we feel that once we can open this channel, communciation and collaboration will be even more efficient and our work will have more profund global impact.

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Demonstrated Need

We are directly addressing the global need of confronting hate, which can be defined as racism, bigotry, anti-Muslim bias, and anti-Semitism. We're doing this in an intersectional way (please excuse the buzzword), in that we are working with group globally who believe in collaboration, peace building, and eradicating senseless hatred and violence.

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Program Accomplishments

Before we had our formal conference in November, our Connecting Action network was able to help around 800 refugees in Austria, Germany, and Hungary, through donations of food, clothing, blankets and winter coats. We activated the network in August 2015 through Facebook and were able to get volunteers from across organizations and civil society who wanted ways to help and get involved. We were able to coordinate mobilization that delivered food and help connect refugees with lawyers, employers, and other organizations who provided basic support through language courses and education.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

On the short term, the initial "action" of Connecting Actions-- namely, feeding and clothing refugees-- was a success in that we were able to mobilize people around Europe and the world to gather tangible items (and money with which to purchase those items) and deliver them to people in need. This was a success.

But we are looking to implement long term change as well. Our network, having been launched in November, is still in its preliminary phases, cannot yet be measured. Our means for measuring our own success, however, are as follows: (i) How often do we collaborate? If we are not constantly in touch with each other, either because we are running events in each other's areas or because we could use resources from one another, that will be a failure. (ii) Have we launched our collaboration platform? We hope to have it live by June to streamline all of our collaborative work. This will be a major breakthrough for us and for the field of interfaith and intercultural dialogue. (iii) How many people will we impact? We will look to collectively impact 6,000 individuals this year through our programming, which will mean each organization will have to run events or trainings for at least 200 individuals this calendar year. Frankly, we feel we will absolutely meet and exceed this goal, both because we can reach more people than this and because the reverberations from what people gain at all of our events and trainings will permeate far beyond our direct impact. That said, we're not sure of the expansiveness of our own potential right now, so we too are still figuring that out!


Back to Top

Connecting Actions

About

Connecting Actions is an international symposium for citizen, intercultural, and interfaith dialogue groups to share best practices.

The symposium, hosted by The Muslim Jewish Conference (MJC) in collaboration with Coexister, Three Faith Forum, Faith Matters, and the European Union of Jewish Students, serves to bring citizen, intercultural, and interreligious dialogue groups from around Europe to share their experience in the field: best practices, major mistakes made, and best lessons learned.

The first ever Connecting Actions conference took place in Paris in November 2016 in the backdrop of mounting religious tensions in Europe. The symposium followed a format whereby for the first two days, pressing questions around the concept of active coexistence, methods and objectives of dialogue, challenges, combating radicalism, resources, social message and media coverage were brought forth for intense rounds of discussions. The discussions were facilitated with tested techniques and methodologies. This meeting concluded with an evaluation and a written document, which was communicated to the public via joint press conference on the last day of the conference, November 25.

Since the conference, Connecting Actions has hosted two localized events-- one run by the MJC and the European Union of Jewish Students in Berlin on Muslim Jewish Dialogue, and the other on tolerance training in Vienna. The activist network and symposium received its name based on a global network that one of the organizing organizations, the Muslim Jewish Conference, created on Facebook in response to the refugee crisis, which began last summer. Called Connecting Actions, the group mobilized a few hundred young Muslims and Jews around Europe to help assist the refugees by providing food and clothing for them upon their arrival in Germany, Austria, and Hungary.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The mission and purpse of Connecting Actions is to connect interfaith and intercultural dialogue activists to share best practices on a gloabl scale, something which has never been done before.

Back to Top

Program Description

The program is, essentially, a network. We hosted our first annual conference on Connecting Actions in Paris in November, which brought together 33 organizations to discuss our best practices and what we've all learned in our interfaith and intercultural dialogue work. Many of us have made the same mistakes, and we're creating this network so that we don't all have to learn the lessons over and over again. We are crafting a compendium of knowledge for everyone doing this work globally. We, along with our steering committee and currently network of 33 organizations around the US, Europe, and Asia, are combating hate on local levels, and are simultaneously developing a global network to do so as well.

We are currently in the process of having one of the MJC programming volunteers create a tailored platform through which we can all collaborate and be in touch. We are looking to partner with Asana, a digital task organizer and calendar or Slack. This is still in its preliminary stages, but we feel that once we can open this channel, communciation and collaboration will be even more efficient and our work will have more profund global impact.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

We are directly addressing the global need of confronting hate, which can be defined as racism, bigotry, anti-Muslim bias, and anti-Semitism. We're doing this in an intersectional way (please excuse the buzzword), in that we are working with group globally who believe in collaboration, peace building, and eradicating senseless hatred and violence.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Before we had our formal conference in November, our Connecting Action network was able to help around 800 refugees in Austria, Germany, and Hungary, through donations of food, clothing, blankets and winter coats. We activated the network in August 2015 through Facebook and were able to get volunteers from across organizations and civil society who wanted ways to help and get involved. We were able to coordinate mobilization that delivered food and help connect refugees with lawyers, employers, and other organizations who provided basic support through language courses and education.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

On the short term, the initial "action" of Connecting Actions-- namely, feeding and clothing refugees-- was a success in that we were able to mobilize people around Europe and the world to gather tangible items (and money with which to purchase those items) and deliver them to people in need. This was a success.

But we are looking to implement long term change as well. Our network, having been launched in November, is still in its preliminary phases, cannot yet be measured. Our means for measuring our own success, however, are as follows: (i) How often do we collaborate? If we are not constantly in touch with each other, either because we are running events in each other's areas or because we could use resources from one another, that will be a failure. (ii) Have we launched our collaboration platform? We hope to have it live by June to streamline all of our collaborative work. This will be a major breakthrough for us and for the field of interfaith and intercultural dialogue. (iii) How many people will we impact? We will look to collectively impact 6,000 individuals this year through our programming, which will mean each organization will have to run events or trainings for at least 200 individuals this calendar year. Frankly, we feel we will absolutely meet and exceed this goal, both because we can reach more people than this and because the reverberations from what people gain at all of our events and trainings will permeate far beyond our direct impact. That said, we're not sure of the expansiveness of our own potential right now, so we too are still figuring that out!


Back to Top

Connecting Actions

About

Connecting Actions is an international symposium for citizen, intercultural, and interfaith dialogue groups to share best practices.

The symposium, hosted by The Muslim Jewish Conference (MJC) in collaboration with Coexister, Three Faith Forum, Faith Matters, and the European Union of Jewish Students, serves to bring citizen, intercultural, and interreligious dialogue groups from around Europe to share their experience in the field: best practices, major mistakes made, and best lessons learned.

The first ever Connecting Actions conference took place in Paris in November 2016 in the backdrop of mounting religious tensions in Europe. The symposium followed a format whereby for the first two days, pressing questions around the concept of active coexistence, methods and objectives of dialogue, challenges, combating radicalism, resources, social message and media coverage were brought forth for intense rounds of discussions. The discussions were facilitated with tested techniques and methodologies. This meeting concluded with an evaluation and a written document, which was communicated to the public via joint press conference on the last day of the conference, November 25.

Since the conference, Connecting Actions has hosted two localized events-- one run by the MJC and the European Union of Jewish Students in Berlin on Muslim Jewish Dialogue, and the other on tolerance training in Vienna. The activist network and symposium received its name based on a global network that one of the organizing organizations, the Muslim Jewish Conference, created on Facebook in response to the refugee crisis, which began last summer. Called Connecting Actions, the group mobilized a few hundred young Muslims and Jews around Europe to help assist the refugees by providing food and clothing for them upon their arrival in Germany, Austria, and Hungary.

Back to Top

What is the mission and purpose of this program?

The mission and purpse of Connecting Actions is to connect interfaith and intercultural dialogue activists to share best practices on a gloabl scale, something which has never been done before.

Back to Top

Program Description

The program is, essentially, a network. We hosted our first annual conference on Connecting Actions in Paris in November, which brought together 33 organizations to discuss our best practices and what we've all learned in our interfaith and intercultural dialogue work. Many of us have made the same mistakes, and we're creating this network so that we don't all have to learn the lessons over and over again. We are crafting a compendium of knowledge for everyone doing this work globally. We, along with our steering committee and currently network of 33 organizations around the US, Europe, and Asia, are combating hate on local levels, and are simultaneously developing a global network to do so as well.

We are currently in the process of having one of the MJC programming volunteers create a tailored platform through which we can all collaborate and be in touch. We are looking to partner with Asana, a digital task organizer and calendar or Slack. This is still in its preliminary stages, but we feel that once we can open this channel, communciation and collaboration will be even more efficient and our work will have more profund global impact.

Back to Top

Demonstrated Need

We are directly addressing the global need of confronting hate, which can be defined as racism, bigotry, anti-Muslim bias, and anti-Semitism. We're doing this in an intersectional way (please excuse the buzzword), in that we are working with group globally who believe in collaboration, peace building, and eradicating senseless hatred and violence.

Back to Top

Program Accomplishments

Before we had our formal conference in November, our Connecting Action network was able to help around 800 refugees in Austria, Germany, and Hungary, through donations of food, clothing, blankets and winter coats. We activated the network in August 2015 through Facebook and were able to get volunteers from across organizations and civil society who wanted ways to help and get involved. We were able to coordinate mobilization that delivered food and help connect refugees with lawyers, employers, and other organizations who provided basic support through language courses and education.

Back to Top

How do you measure the success of your program?

On the short term, the initial "action" of Connecting Actions-- namely, feeding and clothing refugees-- was a success in that we were able to mobilize people around Europe and the world to gather tangible items (and money with which to purchase those items) and deliver them to people in need. This was a success.

But we are looking to implement long term change as well. Our network, having been launched in November, is still in its preliminary phases, cannot yet be measured. Our means for measuring our own success, however, are as follows: (i) How often do we collaborate? If we are not constantly in touch with each other, either because we are running events in each other's areas or because we could use resources from one another, that will be a failure. (ii) Have we launched our collaboration platform? We hope to have it live by June to streamline all of our collaborative work. This will be a major breakthrough for us and for the field of interfaith and intercultural dialogue. (iii) How many people will we impact? We will look to collectively impact 6,000 individuals this year through our programming, which will mean each organization will have to run events or trainings for at least 200 individuals this calendar year. Frankly, we feel we will absolutely meet and exceed this goal, both because we can reach more people than this and because the reverberations from what people gain at all of our events and trainings will permeate far beyond our direct impact. That said, we're not sure of the expansiveness of our own potential right now, so we too are still figuring that out!


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