Amir

Amir recruits and trains young Jewish adults to build gardens and farms at summer camps. In doing so, Amir is increasing the number of Jewish role models in our ecosystem, and is growing the movement of young Jews that form community and religious identity through the lens of Tikkun Olam.

Location: Oakland , California
Year founded: 2010

Description

Amir works to transform communities through the medium of Jewish farming. By assisting Jewish communities to grow food for themselves and for others, Amir helps thousands of young Jews connect contemporary issues of climate change, hunger, and animal welfare to our Jewish agricultural and charitable traditions. Amir, in Hebrew, means the top of the tree. Our mission is to provide the next generation an enlightened perspective on their Jewish and moral obligations to the earth and to each other. Amir recruits and trains outstanding young Jewish adults to lead the Amir Project at summer camps, and provides these "Amir Farmers" with continued oversight and support during the summer months. Since 2011, Amir has scaled its model of recruitment, training, and oversight to 22-Jewish summer camps, helping them integrate gardens and farms into their daily schedules and routine. Through this process, Amir is increasing the number of Jewish role models in our educational ecosystem, is changing the culture of Jewish summer camp, and is growing the movement of young Jews that form community - and religious identity - around the Jewish value of Tikkun Olam. Key to Amir's work is its national network. Before the summer, Amir brings together all of its Jewish “Farmers” to teach them the nuts-and-bolts of gardening, and helps them learn important skills in leadership and informal education. Importantly, this 4-day immersive experience brings together Jews from across denomination and background to unite behind Amir’s mission: to teach young campers and staff why, and how, they can be stewards of the earth. During summer 2014, Amir Farmers reached 4,500+ children across the country, and shared with them their passion for Jewish farming and environmental stewardship. Just this past summer, 88% of campers that participated in the Amir Project said they now view growing food as an important expression of tzedakah.

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